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Wahweap and Antelope marinas

How low will it go

  • Lower

    Votes: 35 94.6%
  • Higher

    Votes: 2 5.4%

  • Total voters
    37

jayfromtexas

Well-Known Member
For an indication of just how bad this water year can be, the USBR is reporting that so far the unregulated inflows for the water year 2021 are actually 300,000AF less than 2002, which was the worst year ever.
 

cdrew

Member
I used Antelope Valet on Thursday 5/6/21. On that day they had a backhoe with a post hole auger, mounted on a barge, drilling holes in the cliff face at the waterline to set new eye bolts.

Per the Turn Around Manager, the floating docks are not tied to anchors on the bottom of the channel, but are instead tied horizontally to the rock faces. The original cables were out of the water by about 10 feet, and they broke the surface of the water about 25 or 30 feet from the cliff face.

By now the cables have been reset to the new lower eye bolts. But, those bolts are not under the surface of the water, and for some distance out from the cliff face, the cables are still close enough to the surface to represent a real danger to props. It will get worse as the water level drops.

I can only assume that there are cables running across the main channel, under the Wakeless Zone, that are in need of relocation. Perhaps those were set deeper, maybe by divers, during the original construction. Several years ago, maybe 2006, I can remember passing through Wakeless on my Wave Runner, with the sun directly overhead, and I could see large heavy equipment tires lowered onto rock spires to serve as bumpers. Those rock spires have got to be getting uncomfortably close to the surface.

Things are going to get interesting.
what was your experience with the valet? How was the wait? Did you have to make an appointment?
 

T.kidd

Well-Known Member
have some friends that wound up on the rocks at Antelope. they are experienced boaters , however there was a houseboat hogging the way.
my plan is to launch no later than 6 AM @ Wahweap. spend last nite north of narrows for a hopefully smooth ride through the " Spin Cycle "
should we be able to catch more fish with them bunched up in shallower water ? LOL !
 

Hoskm01

Member
Lots of cables, heavy machine tires, concrete weights on the north side of Antelope in the no wake zone clearly visible, well out of the water. We felt fairly safe about 50 feet off the wall, the cables seem to dive pretty quick.

Launched the HB at Antelope on Monday, see cables on the south side on either side of the Executive Ramp.

original_606325ef-317d-4f7c-9b11-ab356bb9fb2c_PXL_20210517_205703514.jpgoriginal_068eb278-2392-4b25-9b03-793ddb8c38ad_PXL_20210517_205827143.jpg
 

drewsxmi

Well-Known Member
have some friends that wound up on the rocks at Antelope. they are experienced boaters , however there was a houseboat hogging the way.
my plan is to launch no later than 6 AM @ Wahweap. spend last nite north of narrows for a hopefully smooth ride through the " Spin Cycle "
should we be able to catch more fish with them bunched up in shallower water ? LOL !
Were they following Big_Bobberll? - "Some houseboats and ski boats following us were impatient and travelling too closely to us in my opinion and eventually passed us before the end of the no wake zone."
 

Bigbassman

Well-Known Member
Ugh. We have our first-ever houseboat trip coming up next week, renting out of Wahweap. Not looking forward to navigating this stretch and from there uplake, too. Any advice for a first-time captain? We were planning to tow the powerboat, but not so sure about this any longer. We will purchase full waiver of liability protection, for both vessels. :rolleyes:
 

PowellBride

Moderator
Do whatever you can to get through Antelope as early as possible. it might even be worth anchoring around Wahweap the first night depending on what time you actually leave the rental dock. An added benefit of staying close the first night is you can give the houseboat a good test run and you’re close if you need a repair. use your speedboat the first afternoon, go see the dam, explore Wahweap bay, or Navajo canyon.
 

Maverick5207

Well-Known Member
Ugh. We have our first-ever houseboat trip coming up next week, renting out of Wahweap. Not looking forward to navigating this stretch and from there uplake, too. Any advice for a first-time captain? We were planning to tow the powerboat, but not so sure about this any longer. We will purchase full waiver of liability protection, for both vessels. :rolleyes:
Download the Navionics App. Set the water level at minus 47 ft. That will get you thru the edgy areas.
 

Ed_on_WD

Well-Known Member
Towing the boat in rough water or in places that might require maneuvering or anything besides a steady speed WILL REQUIRE EXTRA VIGILANCE. Have someone standing on the back deck to keep an eye on the towed boat and the towing line.

A big wake can part the line or swamp the small boat. Tie off to the small boat using the bow eye (the heavy duty connector that is used to winch the boat onto it's trailer), not a docking cleat. Lightweight deck cleats will rip right out, I've seen it happen.

Use floating line. If you slow the houseboat, the small boat WILL keep coming, and the towing line will end up snarled in the houseboat's prop. That adds a whole new level of stress, and leaves you potentially "stuck in traffic".

Unfortunately, lots of other boaters out there might not realize that you are a first time house boater and towing for the first time. Courteous veteran boaters will avoid rentals, but don't count on anybody to give you the extra space that you will need. Boat defensively, and don't let others force you off course or into the shallows and rocks. In a bad situation, you may even have to be a jerk and lay on the horn and force others to pay attention!

Go slow, and have an observer wearing polarized sunglasses (they allow you to see through the glare) out front looking for rocks just below the surface. You will see the color of the water change to a yellowish hue as you approach a whale. Use binoculars to watch other boats ahead of you, and if they change course, you should too!
 

Bigbassman

Well-Known Member
Do whatever you can to get through Antelope as early as possible. it might even be worth anchoring around Wahweap the first night depending on what time you actually leave the rental dock. An added benefit of staying close the first night is you can give the houseboat a good test run and you’re close if you need a repair. use your speedboat the first afternoon, go see the dam, explore Wahweap bay, or Navajo canyon.
That's actually a great idea. Any suggestions of areas that are ok for anchoring close to Wahweap that first night? It would be good to get used to piloting both crafts before heading out EARLY the next morning.
 

Bigbassman

Well-Known Member
Towing the boat in rough water or in places that might require maneuvering or anything besides a steady speed WILL REQUIRE EXTRA VIGILANCE. Have someone standing on the back deck to keep an eye on the towed boat and the towing line.

A big wake can part the line or swamp the small boat. Tie off to the small boat using the bow eye (the heavy duty connector that is used to winch the boat onto it's trailer), not a docking cleat. Lightweight deck cleats will rip right out, I've seen it happen.

Use floating line. If you slow the houseboat, the small boat WILL keep coming, and the towing line will end up snarled in the houseboat's prop. That adds a whole new level of stress, and leaves you potentially "stuck in traffic".

Unfortunately, lots of other boaters out there might not realize that you are a first time house boater and towing for the first time. Courteous veteran boaters will avoid rentals, but don't count on anybody to give you the extra space that you will need. Boat defensively, and don't let others force you off course or into the shallows and rocks. In a bad situation, you may even have to be a jerk and lay on the horn and force others to pay attention!

Go slow, and have an observer wearing polarized sunglasses (they allow you to see through the glare) out front looking for rocks just below the surface. You will see the color of the water change to a yellowish hue as you approach a whale. Use binoculars to watch other boats ahead of you, and if they change course, you should too!
Great advice! Yes, as others suggested I have Navionics installed, and I guess it makes sense to have someone pilot the small boat until we enter the safer (wider) areas. I plan to go slow, and don't have any problem using the horn, lol! As for floating line, I was just planning to use the bow line included on the rental boat. Do you think that's a floating line?
 

PowellBride

Moderator
That's actually a great idea. Any suggestions of areas that are ok for anchoring close to Wahweap that first night? It would be good to get used to piloting both crafts before heading out EARLY the next morning.
Sorry I'm a north-ender. Only come south when we take the HB to Lake Powell Marine for major repairs. We try to get out of dodge as quick as possible, but I'm sure the south-enders will have suggestions for you.
 

Watty33

Well-Known Member
Great advice! Yes, as others suggested I have Navionics installed, and I guess it makes sense to have someone pilot the small boat until we enter the safer (wider) areas. I plan to go slow, and don't have any problem using the horn, lol! As for floating line, I was just planning to use the bow line included on the rental boat. Do you think that's a floating line?

Not likely. Anchor line sinks. Got to Home Depot and get at least 3/4 inch thick floating line is my suggestion.
 

Ed_on_WD

Well-Known Member
I hope I'm not violating forum rules by posting a commercial link, but here is an Amazon listing for a 60 ft long floating Rope with a 4,100 pound rating. I have no financial interest, I'm just pointing out what's available out there, for the sake of safety.

If I am in the wrong, please delete and accept my apologies. I'm just trying to be helpful.

 

WaterMan

Well-Known Member
I hope I'm not violating forum rules by posting a commercial link, but here is an Amazon listing for a 60 ft long floating Rope with a 4,100 pound rating. I have no financial interest, I'm just pointing out what's available out there, for the sake of safety.

If I am in the wrong, please delete and accept my apologies. I'm just trying to be helpful.

Here is the same rope at Wal Mart for $12.88 4150lbs, just picked up an extra rope for last weekend.


1621553734661.png
 

Ed_on_WD

Well-Known Member
OK, thanks for your alternatives! I posted the first search results that came up under "Floating Rope". We've both shown that the cost of keeping a tow rope out of your prop is a mere drop in the bucket compared to renting a houseboat and a runabout from Aramark.
 
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