Tents

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mtnpull

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We many times stay in a travel trailer in bullfrog, but last year we did a week long San Juan camping trip (which is now planned to be an annual trip) and the tent we took was a pretty cheap Coleman and the wind just about destroyed it. In addition with the wind we ended up with sand in just about every meal we prepped. So this last fall we found this beauty on sale at favelas and picked it up. We threw it up a couple days ago to prep for our next trip and I am very pleased. It has the main sleeping tent / room and then the covered canopy where we can store coolers out of the sun and prep food.

What does everyone else use?20180411_092052.jpg
 

Dungee Fishing

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This is our third year with the kodiak canvas spring bar tent. We love it! It’s so worth all it’s extra weight. On our San Juan trip last year we too brought two cheap piece of crap little tents thinking we’d save on weight... we missed our kodiak terribly.
 

jt465

Active Member
I have a wall tent that I used at Hite once last year. The wind blew and everything inside the tent was covered with a layer of good old southern Utah red sand. I might be able to stake the sod cloth better or pile rocks along the sod cloth but even then I think if the wind blows you’ll get dirty in there. In addition, it’s 12 X 14, and too bulky to haul down the lake in most boats. It’s nice to have the extra space to prep food etc but for beach camping I think Sprigbar is the way to go. One other tip I’ll pass along, dig holes at the corners of your tent, tie a rope around a rock, bury the rock and then tie the rope to your tent stake pocket. If you’re on a sandy beach this will save your tent from getting launched. Learned that one the hard way when a storm turned my Springbar into a kite down at the Rincon. We were pulling up to the beach when we saw it 15 feet in the air. Then it went end over end down the beach for about 50 yards. It bent two of the four bars that connect the roof and give the Springbar its spring. I still use the tent but it’s never been quite the same.
 

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Dorado

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I have a Mountain Hardware 4 person tent that works just fine, and it only weighs 7-8 pounds. There's only my wife and I and out dogs, so there's plenty of room for sleeping, but it we do not use it for anything other than sleeping/getting out of the weather if it rains. The difference between a good quality tent and a Coleman or similar is pretty clear, they are sturdier, have more tie down points, and stay rigid and do not flap and rattle nearly as much. That said, I do not think there is any way to avoid the sand! It permeates the mesh screens, and if the wind blows for a while you WILL be covered in sand. I have learned to accept the fact that everything will be covered in red sand after a 4-5 day trip to Lake Powell!
 

PBH

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We've used Springbar tents for everything for as long as I can remember. Fishing trips to Canada, hunting trips on the Boulder, Lake Powell...they take a beating.

They won't help with providing a covered food prep area, but they will give you a protected place to sleep.
 
I use a cowboy range tent from Dave Ellis in Colorado. Fast and easy to set up, will withstand high wind, and bad weather. It is also built to last a lifetime. They are also breathable canvas so you can safely burn a lantern, stove, or heater.100_1847.JPG
 
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wayne gustaveson

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I have a wall tent that I used at Hite once last year. The wind blew and everything inside the tent was covered with a layer of good old southern Utah red sand. I might be able to stake the sod cloth better or pile rocks along the sod cloth but even then I think if the wind blows you’ll get dirty in there. In addition, it’s 12 X 14, and too bulky to haul down the lake in most boats. It’s nice to have the extra space to prep food etc but for beach camping I think Sprigbar is the way to go. One other tip I’ll pass along, dig holes at the corners of your tent, tie a rope around a rock, bury the rock and then tie the rope to your tent stake pocket. If you’re on a sandy beach this will save your tent from getting launched. Learned that one the hard way when a storm turned my Springbar into a kite down at the Rincon. We were pulling up to the beach when we saw it 15 feet in the air. Then it went end over end down the beach for about 50 yards. It bent two of the four bars that connect the roof and give the Springbar its spring. I still use the tent but it’s never been quite the same.

I also use the spring bar when camping on personal trips.
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Short story. On one of our houseboat parties a Navajo named Clint decided he wanted to go with us uplake. WE pulled into Oak Canyon and it blew all night, hard. Next morning we got up and couldn't find Clint. I noticed a big bump in the sand and there was Clint, completely covered. He was sleeping like a baby. A good tent is a good thing!
 

Wet1

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I use a cowboy range tent from Dave Ellis in Colorado. Fast and easy to set up, will withstand high wind, and bad weather. It is also built to last a lifetime. They are also breathable canvas so you can safely burn a lantern, stove, or heater.View attachment 1998
Wow, those suckers are expensive. I've been using an old canvas Springbar tent for everything from Powell trips to late season elk hunts. Had that thing stay together through 80mph winds in Wyoming one year. Bought it used and took it to the mfg in SLC for some repairs. Found out it's older than 1965, the last year they built the internal frame. It's a year older than me so at 52+ years old it's still performing!
Yes, that's snow in the background. Something you don't see everyday in Red Canyon!
 

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Wow, those suckers are expensive. I've been using an old canvas Springbar tent for everything from Powell trips to late season elk hunts. Had that thing stay together through 80mph winds in Wyoming one year. Bought it used and took it to the mfg in SLC for some repairs. Found out it's older than 1965, the last year they built the internal frame. It's a year older than me so at 52+ years old it's still performing!
Yes, that's snow in the background. Something you don't see everyday in Red Canyon!
Yep, you have to pay for quality! But I know cowboys and hunting guides that live out of canvas tents most of the year in harsh conditions.
 

mtnpull

Well-Known Member
Wow, those suckers are expensive. I've been using an old canvas Springbar tent for everything from Powell trips to late season elk hunts. Had that thing stay together through 80mph winds in Wyoming one year. Bought it used and took it to the mfg in SLC for some repairs. Found out it's older than 1965, the last year they built the internal frame. It's a year older than me so at 52+ years old it's still performing!
Yes, that's snow in the background. Something you don't see everyday in Red Canyon!

My mother had that EXACT tent. The only problem is she gave it to the wrong son who never uses it.
 
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mtnpull

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Has anybody uses the concrete framing stakes to stake down guy wires and tent corners? Or is the dig and bury a rock the best option?
 

treetop

Well-Known Member
How do you like the Alakanak? I was looking at those pretty hard and long.
Hi Adam, i love my Alakanak! It is the 12X12 model, and with the poles, vestuable, spark cover, and floor liner its a fairly bulky and heavy tent.
It’s not one you’d. Take backpacking. I have however used it on some backcountry horse back hunts. You can easily make tent poles from wood poles when you get to your camp.
I've used it in Arizona on the javelina hunts when we had 50 mph wind most of the night and it came through like a champ.
At powell i set it up and put a full size table in it to cook and eat on. And still have plenty of room for all our stuff. Keeps the sand and ravens out of things.
I wish they made an 8X8. I’d buy another
I even take a small crockpot and a honda generator and put a pot roast and potatoes and carrots in and have a hot meal waiting at the end of the day
 
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Gem Morris

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I have a wall tent that I used at Hite once last year. The wind blew and everything inside the tent was covered with a layer of good old southern Utah red sand. I might be able to stake the sod cloth better or pile rocks along the sod cloth but even then I think if the wind blows you’ll get dirty in there. In addition, it’s 12 X 14, and too bulky to haul down the lake in most boats. It’s nice to have the extra space to prep food etc but for beach camping I think Sprigbar is the way to go. One other tip I’ll pass along, dig holes at the corners of your tent, tie a rope around a rock, bury the rock and then tie the rope to your tent stake pocket. If you’re on a sandy beach this will save your tent from getting launched. Learned that one the hard way when a storm turned my Springbar into a kite down at the Rincon. We were pulling up to the beach when we saw it 15 feet in the air. Then it went end over end down the beach for about 50 yards. It bent two of the four bars that connect the roof and give the Springbar its spring. I still use the tent but it’s never been quite the same.

Springbar tents are made in Salt Lake City and the factory has all the replacements you might need. I can help you figure that out and also figure out a way to get them to you if want?
 

jt465

Active Member
Springbar tents are made in Salt Lake City and the factory has all the replacements you might need. I can help you figure that out and also figure out a way to get them to you if want?
Thanks for the offer. I need to get the two bars replaced but have been putting it off. I like Kirkhams, it’s a good company.
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
I have a tip for everyone who uses a springbar tent. This comes from serving as a Scoutmaster for 10 years and camping once per month with the boys in 4 springbar tents during those 10 years.

The side poles that are extendable with the thumb buttons are typically put away by collapsing them into themselves so that they are short enough to fit into the storage bag. I’m sure you’ve noticed that after doing this there are times when it’s nearly impossible to get them extended again because they fit so tightly together. Especially after camping in sandy conditions like Lake Powell.

Next time instead of collapsing them into each other, slide them completely apart and store them separately. The problem of them getting stuck together is completely solved that way.

You’re welcome 😀
 
We have been using one of these for the last couple years and it works great. Very sturdy in the wind and easy to put up. Its a Cabela's lodge tent and more affordable than alot of other bigger nice tentss7_582649_imageset_02.jpeg
 
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