...input on the Lake Powell Pipeline| KSL.com

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
My understanding is that they are installing huge UV light systems on the Glen Canyon dam generators/intakes to keep the turbines mussel free (I have not heard a recent update on this in the past year so I can't vouch that the project is still in motion). I presume they will do the same at the intake for this pipeline. But as Dave and others have said, I have to laugh at the whole premise of intentionally pumping infested Lake Powell water to a non-infested lake - Sand Hollow! Sometimes you just have to say huuuummmmmm......
Just like saying the mussels were a mid-West problem, they'll never reach the Southwest. SMH
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
Actually, I think it's a people distribution issue. Thru out history, humans have traveled to where the resources are. They didn't move the lake to the desert to suite their population needs. ;)
Exactly. To get a good sense of of what natural human habitat would be if we didn’t have the ability to create artificial environments, just look to a habitat map of our close cousins the great apes—gorillas, chimps and orangutans. We are built for warmer equatorial regions with access to fresh water, abundant plant materials, including trees and savannah grasslands, and small game. But as it turns out, we became excellent tool makers and improvisers, and thus figured out a way to extend our reach in the short-term (from an earth history perspective) at the expense of other flora/fauna native habitat and through resource redistribution on a grand scale...

...which explains why, in the original (and best) Planet of the Apes movie, those apes had the sense to live where they did, and considered the desert “the Forbidden Zone”... which amusingly enough was partly filmed at Lake Powell as it filled in 1967-68...
 
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airford1

Well-Known Member
Actually, I think it's a people distribution issue. Thru out history, humans have traveled to where the resources are. They didn't move the lake to the desert to suite their population needs. ;)
We did move the water and we have not managed the use of the water. The California Desert had plenty of ground water in the 1890's, not now we have abused it. Water will soon be the new Gold.
 

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
We did move the water and we have not managed the use of the water. The California Desert had plenty of ground water in the 1890's, not now we have abused it. Water will soon be the new Gold.
Like I said, people distribution problem. California has too many of them. lol. Back thru the centuries, the current situation would warrant it to be time to migrate.
 
Speak now or forever hold your peace. Link to an article on KSL.COM:

How do they think they can get water when there are many more allocated water rights than there is yearly water runoff.
 

Bill Sampson

Well-Known Member
Air Ford made a good point. As much as California is committed to more housing development, the person or corporation with the water will have the power.
 
Water is a commodity, just like natural gas and oil. It has a highest and best use. Should someone be able to take oil from the ground in Texas and send it New York? Of course. Then why not send water from Colorado to California? For water, often the most economically productive use is not its current use. Not rooting for the pipeline, just jotting down questions popping into the ol noggin.
You can not use more water than the river produces. There already more decreed water rights than water available.. Calif has used more water than they are decreed for decades than they have rights for, This is why Lake Mead and Lake Powell are both so low now. The water rights are federally protected so they have some protections from greed.
 

Dillonwhitt

Member
What doesn't make sense to me is we already have a water source from the virgin river that runs year round that ends up in lake mead, So why are we gonna spend millions to steal water from lake powel basically lake mead?
 
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flowerbug

Active Member
do not despair. any place in the world where humans can survive can be improved with some efforts. it really does not take that much water. you just have to learn to work with nature instead of destroying it.

if you need examples of what can be done go check out Permaculture.
 
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