...input on the Lake Powell Pipeline| KSL.com

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
That's interesting technology... but my guess probably works best in subtropical humid places where there is a lot of water in the air to extract, sort of like the byproduct of a swamp cooler... still, a good idea, and never can have too many of those...
 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
I agree - it seems that the higher the humidity the more efficient the technology.

I was surprised to read in the first line of the brief that 2 million people in the USA don't have running water! This could be just word salad, i.e. there is water available via well or some other source, they just haven't tapped into it. I'm interested in the data behind that claim - are their people living in 3rd world country conditions in the USA (besides San Francisco:giggle:), or are there just a lot of cabins that must have water trucked in? More data seems appropriate to ask for if making such a claim.

But one thing is clear, with new technology, much of it developed and tested initially for the marine environment, it is becoming easier to live "off the grid" than ever - power (for refrigeration, growing food, etc.), water for drinking and sanitary use, etc.
 

PBR

Active Member
I don't think that is going to help our lake in the middle of the desert. Any water that gets pulled out of the air is less water that is going fall to the ground somewhere else. If these were set up on every roof in California what would it do the amount of rain and snow that falls on the Rocky Mountains?
 

Cliff

Well-Known Member
There is no shortage of water for survival-even living-
It's how we use it that is the problem!

The Israelis have a lot of it figured out.
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
I don't think that is going to help our lake in the middle of the desert. Any water that gets pulled out of the air is less water that is going fall to the ground somewhere else. If these were set up on every roof in California what would it do the amount of rain and snow that falls on the Rocky Mountains?
Yes, lots of technical issues there, but I don't think squeezing water out of air would make a lot of difference in how much rain or snow falls in the Rockies. In general, those snow-making weather systems are dynamic and happen either because of a large cold moist front from the northwest or northern California, or as a clash between warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico meeting colder air from Canada. Pulling water out of the air over the Utah desert wouldn't change that dynamic very much if at all. You might ask how much water you can squeeze out of air, and of course that depends on the temperature of the air. Warmer air can hold more water vapor. But if you assume room temperature (say 72 degrees), and 50% relative humidity (i.e., the air is holding 50% of the total water vapor it could potentially hold at that temperature), there is about a liter of water in 118 cubic meters of air, or a cube of air about 5 meters on a side. Translate that into something that makes sense for most people, and you get about a gallon of water out of the first three feet of air overlying an acre of land. Not a whole lot of water. You would just have to keep squeezing the air until it's dry, then wait until that air parcel is replenished by moist air brought in on the wind... not sure how long it would take to get a usable amount of water, but you could at least get some...
 

Cliff

Well-Known Member
What's the average humidity level in the Utah desert? In the summer we see levels down in the single digits
Shall we say "dry conditions" not suitable to squeezing water out f it.
We do however get 29 degrees depression in temperature from a swamp cooler at 8% humidity level.
 
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