Fly Fishing for Bass!!

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
I bought just a cheap flyrod to "play" with at the lake. Not experienced with it at all but did catch a few smallies the last time we were out. Had some fun with that thing, but still like my casters a little better......Maybe because it's easier and I can get farther away with them. lol
 
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wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
Fly fishing is one of the best techniques to attract those fussy stripers that are not active after the sun hits the water. Try fly fishing with a small clouser minnow or just a white hackle. The stripers I caught yesterday were all eating plankton. They do eat but really prefer the smallest food items possible. In some years during May I have been severely out fished for stripers. Fly fishing experts (Dave Sellers) can catch lots of stripers with just the right fly along the east walls during early morning before the sun hits the water over the length of Lake Powell..

Check out the old fish reports for May for more information: May 15, 2019 - May is Spawning Month
 
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TR.

Well-Known Member
Sorry, out of town and just saw this a little late...meeting up with the silver king. Clouser floating minnow cast tight into rocky shore lines will surprise you. Usually by second strip. Chartreuse and white works great. You can also use a gurgler. During striper boils I go to a hard body popper for longevity and they will often hit it before it hits the water. Try it and see. Deeper water bass flies I have great success with at powell are meat whistles and clousers. And I would agree with the above, Ross service is second to none. I was heading to Honduras one time and I had an issue with a reel. I think it was Reynolds who sent me two new rings not just one, just in case and at no charge. After I told him I was not the original owner of the reel. That reel caught me a nice tailing permit that week and performed flawlessly. Best customer service in the industry.
 

PBH

Well-Known Member
So why would you go through the stress of fly fishing when you can kill 'em with plastics on a spinning rig? 😃
for some of us, we struggle thinking about using anything other than a fly rod, regardless of species. I get a lot of funny looks when I'm standing on the bow of my Ranger boat casting a fly rod. Oh well.


The trick with fishing is convincing a fish to take a lure that it doesn't want. Anything else is just too easy.
 

MYam4

Active Member
I was camping in Face Canyon this weekend (first tried Padre Bay but boy was that packed) and yesterday I noticed the bass in our little cove were randomly coming up to the surface all over yesterday, like trout coming up for a hatch. I tried casting a Sammy a few times (all I had for topwater) with no luck. I brought a flyrod and a box of streamer flies I had for trout, which didn't help in that situation either. Do bass take insects off the surface? What do bass come up for? I feel determined to figure this out by next trip!
 

TR.

Well-Known Member
My experience with Powell is that the bass like movement and while I am sure they are opportunistic I feel they are very piscivorous. Wayne and others would know the answer to that. When I fly fish for bass I try to figure out where in the water column they are so I can get food to them. That is the reason you will see responses to line choice at powell so varied, it is all about getting to where the fish are. Smallies are in rock piles, period. That one is easy, although for the most part the smaller ones are up on shore...mostly. Sometimes there is a whopper an inch from a shore rock just waiting. They go where the food is. My experience with largemouth there is that when you find a good depth stick to it. While I love to stick big bruisers with a fly, it is hard to get to where they usually are, both in structure and depth, on the fly. I will pick up a bunch of smaller ones on the fly rod and then go hunting pigs with a spinning rod. Last, most lures are designed to catch fisherman not fish is the saying. To me, it may not be a certain variation of color or even type sometimes. We worry too much about the hot lure. It is more important getting a lure to the right location, and then getting the right movement. That is how I pick flies. Deep fish and I tie up a really heavy clouser and chuck and duck. Not so deep and my options open up a lot. Add the right line to the right fly and you get the desired depth. Trout flies absolutely will work at the right time. I posted a pic probably 10 years ago of a monster carp on a Size 12 royal Wolff. Maybe try a spinning rod to get location and depth, then figure out the fly combo that matches. Or just drink a beer and have fun. Or I could just be entirely full of "TR" lol. Tight lines.

TR
 
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wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
I was camping in Face Canyon this weekend (first tried Padre Bay but boy was that packed) and yesterday I noticed the bass in our little cove were randomly coming up to the surface all over yesterday, like trout coming up for a hatch. I tried casting a Sammy a few times (all I had for topwater) with no luck. I brought a flyrod and a box of streamer flies I had for trout, which didn't help in that situation either. Do bass take insects off the surface? What do bass come up for? I feel determined to figure this out by next trip!
I don't see a lot of bass coming to the surface as you described but I have seen a lot of surface activity in the southern lake with fish feeding early and late on plankton. I can just see their little jaws poking out of the water and sucking along the surface. Surprisingly these obvious fish are usually carp.
stbnose.jpg
 

MYam4

Active Member
I assumed it was bass, but not positive about that. Could be another species. But instead of poking their jaws up, they'd hit the the surface with a splash. That would be interesting if it was plankton.
 

wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
I assumed it was bass, but not positive about that. Could be another species. But instead of poking their jaws up, they'd hit the the surface with a splash. That would be interesting if it was plankton.
We have another bully out there that is really rambunctious with lots of surface splashing. That noisy one is the gizzard shad. They do not bite bass jigs either.
 
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