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Question for KYKevin

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GPSPOWELL

Active Member
Hey Kevin, In the thread re: Striper meat quality you said something about "them" killing off the lake next year. I saw a reference to that from you in a different thread as well. I can't seem to find any info about that anywhere. Can you elaborate?
 

KYKevin

Escalante-Class Member
I was talking about Pelican lake, there going to kill it out, and replant it, from what I have read. There going to do it in 2018. Are we talking about the same lake? Pelican lake, out by Ouray?
 

mann4ducks

Active Member
I was talking about Pelican lake, there going to kill it out, and replant it, from what I have read. There going to do it in 2018. Are we talking about the same lake? Pelican lake, out by Ouray?
hey are you starting rumors LOL are you going to be down at LP this weekend?? give me a call if so.
 

GPSPOWELL

Active Member
I wasn't sure which lake you were talking about. I thought the G&F had stopped the practice of "killing" lakes as a futile exercise.
 

John P Funk

Escalante-Class Member
Colorado Parks and Wildlife killed Miramonte Reservoir in SW Colorado about 5 years ago, because someone thought it would be smart to put smallmouth bass in it. They never got any size, and ruined the trout fishery, it's back to being pretty good for trout again, and I hope they learned their lesson. It's not a big reservoir, and only has inflow in the spring from runoff so the logistics were manageable. It was probably the same individual who put smallies in the lower Dolores. I've caught a few, but they were not very big, this summer I intend to try some deeper pools with flies, sounds like fun too me.
 

PBH

Well-Known Member
I wasn't sure which lake you were talking about. I thought the G&F had stopped the practice of "killing" lakes as a futile exercise.

rotenone is still a very effective and useful tool for managing fisheries. The public often times is opposed, but that is usually due to a lack of understanding of why the tool is necessary to use.

In total, there are only four (4) fishery management tools:
1) rules and regulations
2) public relations and education (ie: Lake Powell!)
3) fish stocking and fish removal
4) habitat improvement and manipulation


After an accurate assessment of limiting factors is made, the choice of what tool should be selected to implement a management change is relatively easy. Whether it is practical or cost effective might be another story. Rotenone is very effective in eliminating fish, but may not always be cost effective or practical. Then again, it might be exactly the correct solution (Scofield?).
 
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