picked up another 16lb Danforth

26Biesemeyer

Well-Known Member
My buddies got back from Memorial day with tales of high adventure on shore. Their BOAT was sideways onshore due to wind and anchor pull. you may know that drill and seen it a few times...pure chaos with easy-ups rotating in the sky; wind and sand; boats dragging?

I bought another anchor to run a bow offset dual anchor setup. My boat is a plump 25'5 and taller than I've ever been off the water in a under 26ft.

10 feet of 5/16 chain too.

Now all I gotta do is get them mounted on bow or leave in the cabin and pass through hatch?. :)

 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
What exactly is a 'bow offset dual anchor setup'? Is the new anchor and chain for your bow anchor, anchoring bow out with one anchor aft port and starboard to shore? If so, that's the setup I use on my 48' (with a bit more chain on the bow anchor) and have not broken loose yet 🤞 (famous last words).

I also have extra anchors for my windward side if storms are expected, but I don't think that would be needed for your if your shore anchors are of decent size.
 

26Biesemeyer

Well-Known Member
nosir, two anchors off the bow..offset by 25 degrees? drop one tug on it... idle back up parallel to first anchor... drop another 30 feet over tug on it. (both set now) Let line out towards shoreline on both until good with getting in and out of stern. deadman anchors in the sand perhaps stern to shore/sand.

I also saw online Two danforths anchors inline on same chain in a diagram.... I like overkill...I like to sleep well at night too :)

How much 5/16's chain do you like? my buddie was talking about his 20foot length of chain...he was the only one who didn't loose anchor set that night / blow....
 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
Got it! I'd never heard of that setup.

Another important item for anchoring is to have small enough lines that they still stretch in lieu of pulling the anchors out. No stretch (or chain) in wind gusts is a recipe for pulling the anchor on a cruiser.
 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
How much 5/16's chain do you like? my buddie was talking about his 20foot length of chain...he was the only one who didn't loose anchor set that night / blow....
I missed your question earlier. You know the purpose of chain rode is chaff protection and to keep the anchor shank parallel to the bottom as much as possible. Although in ocean anchoring it's recommended to have at least chain in the length of your boat, I do not believe that is necessary (and is a detriment) when anchoring a cruiser boat at Lake Powell because of key differences in the wind load.

In the Ocean, you usually have a single point of contact with the bottom - one anchor, and the boat swings 360 degrees with the wind and waves always coming from the bow. An all chain rode works great here, or as much as you can carry weight wise.

At Lake Powell, with a cruiser, you usually are anchored bow out to the open water and stern anchored to shore, or if bow in, all anchor points on land (like all houseboats anchor), so the boat takes wind and wave load directly broadside many times. The setup you describe would be similar. This doesn't happen in the Ocean when swinging 360. When this happens at LP, an "all chain" rode is not what you want as there is no 'give' in the chain, so when a significant wind gust hit you broadside, something has to give - either the anchor will pull, the chain will break, or the cleat on board will pull out of the deck. The chain is not going to break :oops: , so one of the other two will have to give.

For your 26' boat, I would recommend 6'-10' of chain attached to each anchor, shackled to some nylon or polyester high quality 1/2" anchor line and at least a 5:1 scope if anchored bow out. This will provide you the stretch needed when those 50 mph gusts hit you broadside as you know they will! If you do decide to use an all chain anchor rode, you must use a snubber that will accomplish the same thing as I mentioned using a nylon or polyester anchor rode will. You can make a snubber yourself or buy one, but my experience is it's much easier to use a chain and nylon rode setup.

P.S. my boat weighs 35,000 lbs. x 48'. For my bow anchor, I use 30' of 5/16" chain attached to 3/4" double brain nylon anchor rode. My stern anchors port and starboard utilize Guardian G-37 anchors, 6' of 5/16" chain, and 5/8" double braid anchor rode. For my 25' boat, I use a similar setup with less chain and 1/2" nylon rode.

I hope this helps! It's what I"ve used for over 20 years with a big cruiser with no problems. And of course this is just my opinion and what works for me. I'm sure other opinions may be just as relevant.
 

PJS

Member
When you all talk about anchoring bow out, I am assuming this must be in places where sand exists on the bottom, correct? What is the option if the bottom is all sandstone? Move to another location, right? I have been in more than one location where there is plenty of sand on shore but nothing but sandstone below the water. But that was many years ago at LP when the water levels were 75+ feet higher than today.
 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
When you all talk about anchoring bow out, I am assuming this must be in places where sand exists on the bottom, correct? What is the option if the bottom is all sandstone? Move to another location, right? I have been in more than one location where there is plenty of sand on shore but nothing but sandstone below the water. But that was many years ago at LP when the water levels were 75+ feet higher than today.
You are correct, you must have a sand or mud bottom to anchor bow out. If you have a fish finder/depth sounder you can read what the bottom is made up of by the color and thickness of the bottom structure on the sounder. If it is at least 4 ft thick of sand or mud, we feel OK anchoring bow out.
 

Skibum

Well-Known Member
26Bliesemeyer... I have a 30’ boat with a similar profile to yours. When the canvas is up, it presents a high wind profile. I was camped in Rock Ck through Memorial Day weekend and the following week. I’ll testify to the blows that we had from almost every point on the compass.
I’ve swung on the hook in some of those heavy blows, but even with a gps anchor alarm, I sleep better securely pinned to a beach. I like the concept of bow out anchorage, but with dogs and a companion SeaDoo, bow in works better for me with modifications I’ve used for years that serves the dual purpose of solid security, but with no bow on the beach. I can’t exactly picture what your doing with your bow anchors, but I suspect it’s similar to my scheme that uses iron stakes and 100’ lengths of 3/8 braided nylon.
I have my wife at the helm to keep the boat in position while I go out onshore. First thing I do is drive 2 stakes into the sand angled out from each side front cleat, stakes angled away from the pull. I quickly take out a 100’ line and secure the bow to each line with the bow just resting on the sand (we have keel protection). If it’s not a blow, that will usually hold the boat in position while I drive stakes (or use large rocks, trees, whatever instead of stakes) at 45°+ angles out from the stern and throw lines to my wife who loosely secures to an aft cleat. At this point, i push the bow back slightly and drive an iron stake into the water angled to the back of the boat as close to the bow as I can. Then I take another heavy braided shorter line with a factory eye at the end and place that over the stake anchored in the water. (Don’t underestimate the hold of a stake driven into wet sand, but test 😬). I lift the anchor up enough to bring the line up through the anchor roller and let it sit on the bow pulpit for a minute while I loosen the two bow lines as necessary and with the stern lines slack, I push the bow back so the boat is floating off shore. At that point, I pull tight the free end of the line I have passed up through the anchor and secure it to the anchor anchor cleat with a couple good cleat hitches. Now with the bow held offshore, I adjust bow and stern lines to be secure. With the blows M Day, I used 2 stakes on the shore end of each of the lateral bow and stern lines. I drive them deep, test security and find another spot if needed. They are driven front and back of each other in the same line as the rope and the rope secured to them similar to a cleat hitch pattern on each one and secured back to the standing line with a series of hitches. For pants and suspenders, if there are rocks convenient, lay them on the line as it goes to the stakes similar the the concept of anchor chain rode holding the pull as horizontal as possible. This also helps on the thick line I use to hold the bow off shore, especially if people are laying down wakes behind the stern or if the wind comes in off the lake. Depending on how you sleep in the bow V berth, this also allows you to not sleep with your head lower than your feet. With heavy blows in the night, I’ll occasionally get up and shine a light on them. Sometimes I’ll bring the drive up, but M Day week I had a shift bellow leaking so I kept it down to minimize water in the bilge.
This technique even has more mechanical advantage if you find a V shaped cove to use. I’m sure this is clear as mud... I’m going to try to do a couple rudimentary sketches from above and the side and attach it. A71090AC-0CBC-42E8-BBD7-075EF4F1ACBA.pngFFFC9682-BA68-4673-AD00-761118852968.png
 

Pegasus

Well-Known Member
26Bliesemeyer... I have a 30’ boat with a similar profile to yours. When the canvas is up, it presents a high wind profile. I was camped in Rock Ck through Memorial Day weekend and the following week. I’ll testify to the blows that we had from almost every point on the compass.
I’ve swung on the hook in some of those heavy blows, but even with a gps anchor alarm, I sleep better securely pinned to a beach. I like the concept of bow out anchorage, but with dogs and a companion SeaDoo, bow in works better for me with modifications I’ve used for years that serves the dual purpose of solid security, but with no bow on the beach. I can’t exactly picture what your doing with your bow anchors, but I suspect it’s similar to my scheme that uses iron stakes and 100’ lengths of 3/8 braided nylon.
I have my wife at the helm to keep the boat in position while I go out onshore. First thing I do is drive 2 stakes into the sand angled out from each side front cleat, stakes angled away from the pull. I quickly take out a 100’ line and secure the bow to each line with the bow just resting on the sand (we have keel protection). If it’s not a blow, that will usually hold the boat in position while I drive stakes (or use large rocks, trees, whatever instead of stakes) at 45°+ angles out from the stern and throw lines to my wife who loosely secures to an aft cleat. At this point, i push the bow back slightly and drive an iron stake into the water angled to the back of the boat as close to the bow as I can. Then I take another heavy braided shorter line with a factory eye at the end and place that over the stake anchored in the water. (Don’t underestimate the hold of a stake driven into wet sand, but test 😬). I lift the anchor up enough to bring the line up through the anchor roller and let it sit on the bow pulpit for a minute while I loosen the two bow lines as necessary and with the stern lines slack, I push the bow back so the boat is floating off shore. At that point, I pull tight the free end of the line I have passed up through the anchor and secure it to the anchor anchor cleat with a couple good cleat hitches. Now with the bow held offshore, I adjust bow and stern lines to be secure. With the blows M Day, I used 2 stakes on the shore end of each of the lateral bow and stern lines. I drive them deep, test security and find another spot if needed. They are driven front and back of each other in the same line as the rope and the rope secured to them similar to a cleat hitch pattern on each one and secured back to the standing line with a series of hitches. For pants and suspenders, if there are rocks convenient, lay them on the line as it goes to the stakes similar the the concept of anchor chain rode holding the pull as horizontal as possible. This also helps on the thick line I use to hold the bow off shore, especially if people are laying down wakes behind the stern or if the wind comes in off the lake. Depending on how you sleep in the bow V berth, this also allows you to not sleep with your head lower than your feet. With heavy blows in the night, I’ll occasionally get up and shine a light on them. Sometimes I’ll bring the drive up, but M Day week I had a shift bellow leaking so I kept it down to minimize water in the bilge.
This technique even has more mechanical advantage if you find a V shaped cove to use. I’m sure this is clear as mud... I’m going to try to do a couple rudimentary sketches from above and the side and attach it. View attachment 5261View attachment 5262
Skibum, I like your setup as it keeps the boat floating entirely. The problem I have with a bow-in to shore setup with bow on the beach is the wake/surf boats passing behind literally lift the entire boat up and slam the bow down onto the beach - the entire structure of the boat rattles when this happens. And nowadays, this is an every trip problem (who invented boats that intentionally make huge waves? :unsure:) Your setup solves this problem, but still offers the security of being entirely anchored to shore. Nice creativity!
 

BSBOULEVARD

Member
Howdy, I recently purchased a box style anchor and deployed it at Powell last week. We anchored about 25 yards off shore to fish about a mile up lake from the Labyrinth wall for several hours. There was heavy boat traffic along with tour boats and a light breeze. The anchor never budged.
We camp beached so I can sleep without worrying...
 

Attachments

PJS

Member
I have a box anchor to use as well.

here's a diagram of the dual anchor setup from bow I was contemplating:

Where is shore in your diagram? Are those anchors on shore or below the surface?

Wind direction never seems to be that predictable at Powell, especially when T-storms are around.
 

Skibum

Well-Known Member
26Blesemeyer...first off, +1 on the drawing! It puts my etch-a-sketch attempt to shame 😎

I’m sure not an anchoring expert and had never heard of the box anchor until I followed Ryan’s link. I have a plow anchor hanging from my bow pulpit and carry a pretty heavy Danforth as a backup. After watching the box anchor video, i find it an intriguing design, particularly the quick set and compact storable size.. I can see that as an easy quick pitch for an afternoon of hanging under a shady overhang or fishing and could consider replacing my Danforth backup just to save space and chain weight in the locker. I guess I’d like more info before I hung a heavy boat on it to anchor out in open water overnight in high winds.
I’m too am confused where the shore is in your diagram. I initially presumed you’re anchoring bow in. Now with the wind vector, I’m presuming bow out, but still shore mooring at the stern. If that’s the case with two added angled stern lines to shore, I’d think your setup as drawn would function even with a wind shift. I could see it maybe being a pain to weigh two anchors for a quick ice cream run, (You know how it is when the urge hits) or weighing them in a crosswind since you have to maneuver over two offset anchors to gain release. In your boat photo, I can’t see any midship cleats, but they could be retractable. I do see what appears to be a cleat on the side of the bow. For a belt and suspenders approach, I think you might accomplish the same stable lateral bow security as your diagram with less hassle by anchoring bow out with a single bow anchor, with two offset angled stern lines supplemented by two more offset shore lines to midship cleats if available, or to the visible bow cleat.
 
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