Keel Protectors

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mtnpull

Well-Known Member
Hey guys, seeking some input on a good keel protector for my Crestliner Sportfish 2150. Any recommendations?

Thanks.
 

Dungee Fishing

Well-Known Member
From what I have gathered on the matter I found that with Crestliner's keel it was difficult to find a good one. As you know we have that protruding keel with essentially 4 90 degree angles to work around. Add onto that they can be tricky to install in general, are expensive and most wont guarantee a warranty unless a dealer puts it on for you. I thought it was too much of a hassle for minimum gain. Other than paint scraping off there hasn't been any type of damage from pulling up pretty much anywhere at Powell.
 

Ringer

Well-Known Member
I have used both the Hamby's original and the peel and stick Hamby's. Both stayed on and were tough. The original needs to be put on by a dealer as it uses epoxy. I have beached the original many times and never had an issue. They are great keel protectors. I would call the dealer and ask them if they will work on your keel. I have only used them on glass bass boats.
 

bobco

Well-Known Member
I would recommend buy a couple of cans of touch up paint from Crestliner, when it get bad enough you cannot stand touch up the keel. Great part of tin boat hard to damage. My ranger has hambys and it is great, dont.lnow if it work on aluminium
 

mtnpull

Well-Known Member
From what I have gathered on the matter I found that with Crestliner's keel it was difficult to find a good one. As you know we have that protruding keel with essentially 4 90 degree angles to work around. Add onto that they can be tricky to install in general, are expensive and most wont guarantee a warranty unless a dealer puts it on for you. I thought it was too much of a hassle for minimum gain. Other than paint scraping off there hasn't been any type of damage from pulling up pretty much anywhere at Powell.

Yeah, it seams like there is really nothing out there. I wonder why Crestliner doesn't manufacturer one specifically for their hulls. Would seem a corner on the market. But the hard part for me is taking that nice new boat and knowingly putting scratches in the paint every time you beach it to camp. Ouch! But then again, I've already scratched her up from last year....what's a few more?
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it seams like there is really nothing out there. I wonder why Crestliner doesn't manufacturer one specifically for their hulls. Would seem a corner on the market. But the hard part for me is taking that nice new boat and knowingly putting scratches in the paint every time you beach it to camp. Ouch! But then again, I've already scratched her up from last year....what's a few more?

You can use an Anchor Buddy so you don’t have to beach it
 

Kbass

Well-Known Member
I had had a Keelguard on my center console fiberglass boat for 18 yrs. They are/were made here in Ogden Ut. they definitely work. Recently when I got the new Lund I researched keel protectors through blogs and manufacturers for application on aluminum boats. It appears that the adhesion to aluminum is a problem. They have to scuff the paint down to aluminum and then get the guard to stick to the aluminum. There seems to be a lot of complaints about it not lasting very long and coming partially dislodged. Then the big complaint was how to remove it after it was dangling from the keel. Some protector companies were not even recommending their product for aluminum boats. I did not get one.
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
If you have a glass boat and are at Powell a lot a keel guard is a must. Alu, not so much. To look under your boat and see raw fiberglass is a real bummer. Fiberglass will absorb water, the reason for gelcoat. The sandy beaches are the places I prefer to put in but sanding the gelcoat off is the consequence. All the marine catalogs offer many different brands. I like the ones you glue (epoxy) on. Prep is critical and not a quick job but well worth the 150 to 200 bucks. IMHO. I always bring the front of the keel guard well above the water line, not only to keep the waves from trying peel it back but also to try to limit exposure to any rocks that might hit that area in dicey situations while beaching.
 

ROSCOELAB

Well-Known Member
Glastron's ran a true keel, none of the protectors would work, I had some damage and when they repaired the keel I had them do a 4" bed liner spray for 8' , they did it in white to match the gel coat and it did not change the speed (drag) at all, loved that I could come in to a beach after that and felt protected, never had problems with that, sold the boat to a friend, he hasn't had any delam or damage from rocks.
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Glastron's ran a true keel, none of the protectors would work, I had some damage and when they repaired the keel I had them do a 4" bed liner spray for 8' , they did it in white to match the gel coat and it did not change the speed (drag) at all, loved that I could come in to a beach after that and felt protected, never had problems with that, sold the boat to a friend, he hasn't had any delam or damage from rocks.
That's a great idea. The last boat I put a keel guard on was an 18' glastron so they must have made different hull designs, it was an older boat.
 

bobco

Well-Known Member
Awesome idea, the linex guys in Montrose did the bottom of a guys drift boat here in .Montrose, looked great .
 

CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
Anchor buddy - A long bungie cord connected to your anchor.

As you approach the beach, about 50 feet away, drop the anchor connected to the bungie buddy.

As you approach, the bungie will slow you down, and eventually stop the boat about 3 feet from hitting the beach (if you timed it correctly).

Then just jump out, and go secure a beach or sand anchor to keep the back (or front) of the boat floating off shore a few feet.

That way, the front of the boat never touches anything.

IMG_0007.JPG
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Anchor buddy - A long bungie cord connected to your anchor.
A great idea
As you approach the beach, about 50 feet away, drop the anchor connected to the bungie buddy.

As you approach, the bungie will slow you down, and eventually stop the boat about 3 feet from hitting the beach (if you timed it correctly).

Then just jump out, and go secure a beach or sand anchor to keep the back (or front) of the boat floating off shore a few feet.

That way, the front of the boat never touches anything.

View attachment 1681
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
Anchor buddy - A long bungie cord connected to your anchor.

As you approach the beach, about 50 feet away, drop the anchor connected to the bungie buddy.

As you approach, the bungie will slow you down, and eventually stop the boat about 3 feet from hitting the beach (if you timed it correctly).

Then just jump out, and go secure a beach or sand anchor to keep the back (or front) of the boat floating off shore a few feet.

That way, the front of the boat never touches anything.

View attachment 1681
I love the anchor buddy. The only difference for me is I anchor bow out so that in the event you get a big crashing storm coming onto the beach it doesn’t swamp your boat
 

mtnpull

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the replies! For those using anchor buddy's, how do they hold up in the heavy winds / storms that can roll through at times? I would worry about your boat coming loose and waking up to a missing boat? I have also had a friend mention the bedliner option. Seams that might be a good option if they can do a clean job and match your paint scheme.
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
There are two reasons why my anchor buddy system works better than a normal anchor line.

First, because the line stretches significantly it absorbs all the shock from the waves pounding. Your anchor stays exactly where you put it and never pulls free because there’s not nearly the stress and strain of a constant pounding on the anchor and it’s line every time a wave hits your boat.

Second, I add what I call a “maximum stretch line” to the system. I pull the anchor buddy as tight as I possibly can before using it the first time, cut a normal anchor line that length and tie it in place and leave it permanently attached running in parallel to the stretch line. So really you have the best of both worlds and I sleep with no problems at night.

I have no idea why these aren’t more popular.

Your boat floats away from shore (read danger) when it’s at anchor. When you want to get on the boat you pull on the shoreline to bring your boat close and step on let go of the shoreline and it takes you back out to deep water.

When I go to leave the camp I snap a simple buoy between the shore line and the deep water anchor so the buoy is floating there for me to come back, snap the deepwater anchor to the bow and the shoreline to the stern and pull myself to shore.

It is really slick I promise you.

Like Chris McBeth said it takes a little practice to make it so that you get your anchor placed properly so that when you’re at maximum stretch you’re close to the shore but not hitting.

This challenge can be easily overcome by adding another line to the end of the stretch line so that you can easily adjust the length of it then simply adjust your shoreline accordingly. It’s really sweet. Someday I should make a video how well the system works.

Friends that camp with me and come on my boat for the first time think it’s ingenious

I’ve used this system exactly as described for more than 25 years and have never had an issue.

A side benefit of using this system is that it’s impossible to get on my boat without wading into approximately knee-deep water. That keeps all the sand on shore and out of my boat where it belongs. If you put on a keel guard and beach your boat, people will climb up a bow ladder or step into your boat directly from shore and track lots of sand with them
 
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Ryan

Well-Known Member
@Gem Morris your description of the “parallel line” is exactly what the manufacturer of the anchor buddy recommends.

I have one, but haven’t used it since I bought my Malibu. If we go to shore to let people out, I catch the boat and let it float while they disembark. Then float the boat until they are ready to come in. Then I back the boat in until I can catch it in just under waist deep water. Then push off again.

I probably should start using it again.

That said, I still don’t think I would be comfortable using it overnight. I’ve had Boats at anchor break free before and it isn’t a fun experience.

At Powell, we either tie to the side of the houseboat or when at the marina we find an empty slip nearby (making sure to keep an eye on any Boats who are coming in and I usually know the name of the boat whose slip we are occupying).

I’ve never left the Malibu on the water any other way. If we were camping at Powell I’m not sure what I would do. I just don’t sleep well if the boat is anchored, wether out or on shore.
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
I used to make 3 trips a year to Lake Powell - always camping at either Lone Rock Beach or Stanton - it was like religion - Memorial Day, Labor Day and what we call UEA Weekend in Utah. - never missed - did this over and over and over again while my kids were young - several families together. Truck and camper right on the beach next to the boat out floating in the water. Horrific wind/sand storms at LRB over the years with monster pounding waves. Never had an issue.
 
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