Free Meeting -- The Future of Lake Powell

bubba

Well-Known Member
Some of my greatest free enlightenment is provided by others who think differently.

I am always wanting to learn new things so I welcome views shared but especially challenged. Understanding how others think, or what others think, ultimately gives you the upper hand... Knowledge is king, and even more so with silence and self control.
 

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
I'm sure they don't care about the little towns and businesses that would not exist without Lake Powell. I am included in that group.
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
One of the most interesting presentations I ever attended was put on by the Glen Canyon Institute in SLC in 2008 or so. It was a centered around a slide show of what the canyon looked like before the dam, and had a lot of the usual suspects among those who wanted the lake to disappear. There were a lot of students, and a lot of old people who knew (or felt connected to) the canyon before the lake. There were some scientists and poets, that kind of thing. And of course a lot of that is compelling, but only tells part of the story, though an important part.

Anyway, the best part of that is that for lunch I was sitting between Katie Lee and Ken Sleight, two of the oldest of the "drain the lake" icons, and boy were they interesting to talk with, especially Katie Lee. She must have been 90 or so at the time, but sharp as a tack and as passionate as ever. We had a great conversation, probably lasted close to an hour. She was still an emotional defender of Glen Canyon, a place she knew and loved in the 1950s... I asked her if she'd ever been back since the dam, and she had but only once in the mid-60s... I explained to her that I'm sure I would have loved the old Glen Canyon as she saw it, but my first experiences there were with Lake Powell, and that while different, was the reality I knew, and a place I loved too, perhaps as much as she did of a place that no longer exists. She got that, but for her it came down to the idea that something great was taken away and something she loved. She said we all have a special place, and that was hers. My take was that Lake Powell is my special place.

...and more importantly, that things change, sometimes in ways you don't want them to, but in those changes new perspectives are forged, and they can be equally valid, equally impassioned. She didn't buy that in the case of Glen Canyon. So we talked about different examples of change, some for the better, some for not... In the end, for her, she felt she lost her closest friend, and Lake Powell was a sad reminder of that. And I told her I was sorry about that, but I've got a friend in Lake Powell, and for me, the access it provides to hard to reach places, the beauty it has, and some of the economic benefits make it a friend to many other people. At the same time, I agreed with her that if they had to do it all again, I would say don't build the dam. But the dam is here now, and while much is lost, much is gained, and let's work with that as a baseline. And to consider that if the lake were drained, a whole generation or more would feel exactly as she did in 1963, and is that any more or less fair? But for her, it was the intrinsic value of the environmental setting that was lost, almost as if it were a living thing by itself.

I had to respect her perspective, mainly because I shared some of it, and I think by the end she got where I was coming from. We enjoyed a good lunch together.

Anyway, Katie died at the end of 2017 at 98, but I always sent her a Christmas card after that encounter in 2008, and she'd reply with something funny to say. A really interesting woman, and glad we crossed paths...
 
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CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
One of the most interesting presentations I ever attended was put on by the Glen Canyon Institute in SLC in 2008 or so. It was a centered around a slide show of what the canyon looked like before the dam, and had a lot of the usual suspects among those who wanted the lake to disappear. There were a lot of students, and a lot of old people who knew (or felt connected to) the canyon before the lake. There were some scientists and poets, that kind of thing. And of course a lot of that is compelling, but only tells part of the story, though an important part.

Anyway, the best part of that is that for lunch I was sitting between Katie Lee and Ken Sleight, two of the oldest of the "drain the lake" icons, and boy were they interesting to talk with, especially Katie Lee. She must have been 90 or so at the time, but sharp as a tack and as passionate as ever. We had a great conversation, probably lasted close to an hour. She was still an emotional defender of Glen Canyon, a place she knew and loved in the 1950s... I asked her if she'd ever been back since the dam, and she had but only once in the mid-60s... I explained to her that I'm sure I would have loved the old Glen Canyon as she saw it, but my first experiences there were with Lake Powell, and that while different, was the reality I knew, and a place I loved too, perhaps as much as she did of a place that no longer exists. She got that, but for her it came down to the idea that something great was taken away and something she loved. She said we all have a special place, and that was hers. My take was that Lake Powell is my special place.

...and more importantly, that things change, sometimes in ways you don't want them to, but in those changes new perspectives are forged, and they can be equally valid, equally impassioned. She didn't buy that in the case of Glen Canyon. So we talked about different examples of change, some for the better, some for not... In the end, for her, she felt she lost her closest friend, and Lake Powell was a sad reminder of that. And I told her I was sorry about that, but I've got a friend in Lake Powell, and for me, the access it provides to hard to reach places, the beauty it has, and some of the economic benefits make it a friend to many other people. At the same time, I agreed with her that if they had to do it all again, I would say don't build the dam. But the dam is here now, and while much is lost, much is gained, and let's work with that as a baseline. And to consider that if the lake were drained, a whole generation or more would feel exactly as she did in 1963, and is that any more or less fair? And for her, it was the intrinsic value of the environmental setting that was lost, almost as if it were a living thing by itself.

I had to respect her perspective, mainly because I shared some of it, and I think by the end she got where I was coming from. We enjoyed a good lunch together.

Anyway, Katie died at the end of 2017 at 98, but I always sent her a Christmas card after that encounter in 2008, and she'd reply with something funny to say. A really interesting woman, and glad we crossed paths...
Interesting perspective. thanks for sharing... it makes a lot of sense.

Realistically I don’t know if we can afford to eliminate the lake purely for the ability it gives us to regulate water flow and store enough to get us through several years of drought, etc.

And I’m not sure the economic benefits are related to the activities on the lake and area, as much as the economics related to water and water rights down stream.
 

Tiff Mapel

Well-Known Member
Hi Wordlings,

There's a free public meeting with a panel of "experts" about the future of Lake Powell. Looks to be organized by the drainer crowd.... They'll need some balance in the audience, so hoping some of our Wordling Nation can make it? Utah State University, Logan, Utah, Thursday, Feb. 20th.

Star Hall forum to discuss future of Lake Powell

Powell to the People!

Tiff

Okay, apparently I was wrong. It's not in northern Utah, it'll be in Moab at Star Hall. I wasn't aware there was a University of Utah there???
Tiff
 

Tiff Mapel

Well-Known Member
One of the most interesting presentations I ever attended was put on by the Glen Canyon Institute in SLC in 2008 or so. It was a centered around a slide show of what the canyon looked like before the dam, and had a lot of the usual suspects among those who wanted the lake to disappear. There were a lot of students, and a lot of old people who knew (or felt connected to) the canyon before the lake. There were some scientists and poets, that kind of thing. And of course a lot of that is compelling, but only tells part of the story, though an important part.

Anyway, the best part of that is that for lunch I was sitting between Katie Lee and Ken Sleight, two of the oldest of the "drain the lake" icons, and boy were they interesting to talk with, especially Katie Lee. She must have been 90 or so at the time, but sharp as a tack and as passionate as ever. We had a great conversation, probably lasted close to an hour. She was still an emotional defender of Glen Canyon, a place she knew and loved in the 1950s... I asked her if she'd ever been back since the dam, and she had but only once in the mid-60s... I explained to her that I'm sure I would have loved the old Glen Canyon as she saw it, but my first experiences there were with Lake Powell, and that while different, was the reality I knew, and a place I loved too, perhaps as much as she did of a place that no longer exists. She got that, but for her it came down to the idea that something great was taken away and something she loved. She said we all have a special place, and that was hers. My take was that Lake Powell is my special place.

...and more importantly, that things change, sometimes in ways you don't want them to, but in those changes new perspectives are forged, and they can be equally valid, equally impassioned. She didn't buy that in the case of Glen Canyon. So we talked about different examples of change, some for the better, some for not... In the end, for her, she felt she lost her closest friend, and Lake Powell was a sad reminder of that. And I told her I was sorry about that, but I've got a friend in Lake Powell, and for me, the access it provides to hard to reach places, the beauty it has, and some of the economic benefits make it a friend to many other people. At the same time, I agreed with her that if they had to do it all again, I would say don't build the dam. But the dam is here now, and while much is lost, much is gained, and let's work with that as a baseline. And to consider that if the lake were drained, a whole generation or more would feel exactly as she did in 1963, and is that any more or less fair? And for her, it was the intrinsic value of the environmental setting that was lost, almost as if it were a living thing by itself.

I had to respect her perspective, mainly because I shared some of it, and I think by the end she got where I was coming from. We enjoyed a good lunch together.

Anyway, Katie died at the end of 2017 at 98, but I always sent her a Christmas card after that encounter in 2008, and she'd reply with something funny to say. A really interesting woman, and glad we crossed paths...

That's a great story, JFR. When I was writing "A Wild Redhead Tamed" with Petester, I had emailed Katie with some questions. We had a couple of exchanges back and forth, and I ended up reading her books in the process. Yes, Glen Canyon was her special place, just like Lake Powell is ours.

Tiff
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
That's a great story, JFR. When I was writing "A Wild Redhead Tamed" with Petester, I had emailed Katie with some questions. We had a couple of exchanges back and forth, and I ended up reading her books in the process. Yes, Glen Canyon was her special place, just like Lake Powell is ours.

Tiff
Tiff--I didn't know you wrote a book! I just bought your book...
 

Tiff Mapel

Well-Known Member
Tiff--I didn't know you wrote a book! I just bought your book...
Yes! I've written TWO books about Lake Powell--the aforementioned "A Wild Redhead Tamed" with Pete Klocki and "Lake Powell Tales" which is a compilation of Lake Powell stories from six different authors. You can order them directly from the publisher, iUniverse, or you can find them on Amazon too. (I actually wrote a children's book too... But it's not about Lake Powell... It's called "Bears Don't Ski" and it's about a bear who forgoes hibernation to see what winter is all about, and learns to ski in the process.) But, it's not on Amazon, you have to get copies from me. :)

Tiff
 
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