Drainers - Drowned Canyon

Status
Not open for further replies.

TR.

Well-Known Member
I tend not to comment on these posts as from what I have seen people get pretty fired ( no offense Robert, I am glad you posted the link). For this one time I will say that after reading this story it has many personal opinions and non-factual statements. I don't really worry about the lake getting drained because I don't see it happening in the foreseeable future...therefore I don't get worked up over it. People have a right to express their opinions. That being said, my opinion differs from the author. To say that the lakewill never be full again is not a statement that anyone can make legitimately. To call the Grand Canyon institute "mainstream" is again, a personal opinion that I heartily disagree with. I can't argue that the canyon would return to its original state because I don't know that it would. The argument about evaporation may have truth to it, however there really is no better way to do it. The truth of the matter is that in my humble opinion "drainers" don't really want to conserve/save etc, they simply want the world the way it once was. That could be said about so many things, however until we invent ways to produce water and electricity, draining will never be a serious option because the needs outweigh the beauty...and I believe that lake powell is equally as beautiful as what the canyon once was. Again, just my opinion, which unlike the author of that article mistakes/presents opinion for fact. Mainstream is, however, providing water and electricity to the masses, right or wrong. I hope that I am not proven wrong in the future, however I also don't tend to worry about it to much for the above reasons. And sorry GCI, while I appreciate your intentions, they are not mainstream even if a story says they are. Your rationale just doesn't work for me And I am first and foremost a river rat, with over 10,000 river miles under my belt. Just my couple cents.
 
Last edited:

BruceB

Member
The California Reservoirs were supposed to never fill again either.
All it takes is a change in the weather patterns for a few months and the whole article is blown out of the water.....sorry.

BruceB
 

Watty33

Well-Known Member
I wonder if the drainers get upset when there is an above average precipitation year? Like they are wishing for drought simply to get rid of the dams.
 

Dale

Well-Known Member
And one of those ecowacko idiots seems to be a Regents Professor at the leftist indoctrination center in the People's Republic of Tempe AZ! More wasted tax dollars!
 

Powelldreamer

Well-Known Member
I wonder if the author even understands why boats get dry docked. We pull ours out to perform maintenance, to save on buoy or slip fees during the winter. And for what its worth gamble that we will get a buoy or slip. He draws conclusions with little research. He only draws conclusions based on the narrow canyon walls he creates to back his opinion.
 

Desert Mountain Angler

Well-Known Member
I can't wrap my head around the logic:

Reservoirs are created to store water so that during our dry 'years' there will be enough water to sustain the population. Now that the reservoirs are low (because they are doing their job) there is a group of people that want to drain these lakes to return the environment to its 'natural' state. For the enjoyment that some would find from hiking these canyon's that have been underwater for decades. With no mention of the 100's, 1000's, hundred of thousands' that enjoy the lake at its current state. The millions of people it supports directly and indirectly from the headwaters in CO to Baja. Drinking water, agriculture, food production, recreation....etc.

So we drain the lakes, blow up the dams; there is now not enough water to sustain agriculture and food production the population (that the majority of CA relies on). There is not enough drinking water so the population moves out of the desert (or dies) and the southwest is returned to its 'natural' state of a dry desert. Since there is now no water, or resources, or infrastructure these beautiful canyon will be unexplored because no one will be around to enjoy them.

Irony- CA opinion of water management when the state is in a drought status because they have failed to manage their own water. We should sell that state to Mexico and just pay off our national debt.

What am I missing?
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
What you are are missing is these people don't care about other people. They only care about those that share their views. They are self righteous which gives them the right to discount others who really do know more than them and it also gives them the right to mix facts with opinions and submit it as fact. The article is the perfect example.
 

dubob

Well-Known Member
The article, my LP friends, is nothing more than bovine excrement of the highest odor.
 

Skibum

Well-Known Member
The writer's knowledge of the lake is best summed up by this comment....."The surrounding area is full of houseboats up on blocks, apparently because many vacationers are abandoning the shrinking reservoir"...... This is true...I've seen it!! Even Weeds has noticed the shrinking reservoir and is trying to "abandon" Cropduster. :D

I'm not an atmospheric scientist or geologist, but I would also question the veracity of carbon measurements taken on top of a volcano starting in 1958. Even though inactive, carbon dioxide perfuses through porous volcanic rock and would have definitely spiked during that volcano's eruptions in the '70's and '80s. There is even one hypothesis from a government alphabet group that says the very long term perfusion of carbon dioxide from a massive volcanic area in Siberia eons ago was, or could have been, responsible for the cataclysmic climate warming that eliminated many species from the planet.

All old arguments, so I'm going to move on...

I did like the old photo of Dungeon Canyon though.
 

John P Funk

Well-Known Member
He uses this quote from deBuys as if it were a bad thing, “Thanks to reservoirs large and small, scores of dams including colossi like Hoover and Glen Canyon, more than 1,000 miles of aqueducts and countless pumps, siphons, tunnels and diversions, the West had been thoroughly re-rivered and re-engineered. It had acquired the plumbing system of a giant water-delivery machine. … Today the Colorado River, the most fully harnessed of the West’s great waterways, provides water to about 40 million people and irrigates nearly 5.5 million acres of farmland.” While I agree that there are better uses for water than golf courses in Phoenix and Vegas, I think feeding ourselves and drinking are probably suitable uses of lake water. By the way, there are many miles of slot canyons that are still accessible to hikers in the upper Colorado/White Canyon, so their position is questionable at best.
 

weeds

Well-Known Member
The writer's knowledge of the lake is best summed up by this comment....."The surrounding area is full of houseboats up on blocks, apparently because many vacationers are abandoning the shrinking reservoir"...... This is true...I've seen it!! Even Weeds has noticed the shrinking reservoir and is trying to "abandon" Cropduster. :D
If only that were the reason!!
I've only seen about one third of the 98 canyons. I want to see em all.
(These California article writers are the same ones who think Trump is going to sell California to the Russians. (Not a bad idea)...and put his face on Mt. Rushmore. The odds makers in Ireland say the California thing is at 100 to 1.)
weeds
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top