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Stateline to Last Chance today

Mrs. BigDogGuy

Well-Known Member
We did a 60+ mile round trip by jet ski today, from Stateline Auxiliary to the back of Last Chance. It was my first outing on the lake since last May.

Launching was good, the metal plates are better than I expected.

I was surprised by the ease of getting to the main channel. That twisty section nearer the dam has been a bit spooky, I’ve seen people bump shallow rocks, but now you are really in a channel so fewer worries about unseen rocks just below the surface.

Going by the APM houseboats, the NE (uplake) side had a couple areas to be cautious. About 8 houseboats (so, past BigDog) past the start, there is some sort of floating cylinder under the water on the side across from the house boats and it was surprisingly shallow. Then about 8 houseboats before that row ends (after Location) there is a cable that is spooky shallow on the shore side across from the houseboats.

The channel markers seemed good the whole way. In Last Chance there is a shallow area still under water, but concerning. If you know where the epic pool is, it’s on the other side of Last Chance across from the pool and just a bit deeper down the bay.

Quite an experience to see ‘our’ campsite 156’ lower than the time we camped at full pool

I’m curious if anyone knows what kind of trees these old dead trucks are and how large they grow? Cruising around them we could not see any ground or rocks so they must have been pretty tall and those trucks have been there since the 1960s filling of the lake.

Some one had a lot of time on their hands building an amazing fire pit:
 

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dicksturn

Active Member
When I was a young pup, there was a dead cottonwood next to my place. Having a wood stove I thought what great free firewood. After 1 chainsaw, and 3 chains destroyed, and only a half pickup of wood, I gave up, and wised up. That wood was so dense, apparently water doesn’t affect it either once it dies. Burns terribly and stinks. I’ve seen some approx. 80Ft Tall. They say 70-100'.
 
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Colorado Expat

Active Member
When I was a young pup, there was a dead cottonwood next to my place. Having a wood stove I thought what great free firewood. After 1 chainsaw, and 3 chains destroyed, and only a half pickup of wood, I gave up, and wised up. That wood was so dense, apparently water doesn’t affect it either once it dies. Burns terribly and stinks. I’ve seen some approx. 80Ft Tall. They say 70-100”.
What we learned backpacking in the San Rafael country was to use pinyon and juniper on the fire for evening cooking, but to put a couple of pieces of cottonwood on at the end of the night before turning in, because they burned so slowly that you would still have hot coals the next morning to get things going again. It may burn poorly, but it also burns long.
 

dicksturn

Active Member
What we learned backpacking in the San Rafael country was to use pinyon and juniper on the fire for evening cooking, but to put a couple of pieces of cottonwood on at the end of the night before turning in, because they burned so slowly that you would still have hot coals the next morning to get things going again. It may burn poorly, but it also burns long.
Agreed, after getting a great fire going. We switched to coal which was dirt cheap for the overnight burn in the stove. I think a whole truckload was about $12-15? Better on the chainsaws, but dirty to handle.:D
 

nzaugg

Well-Known Member
Agreed, after getting a great fire going. We switched to coal which was dirt cheap for the overnight burn in the stove. I think a whole truckload was about $12-15? Better on the chainsaws, but dirty to handle.:D
Watch out for buildup in your smokestack. The creosote builds in the stack more readily than wood fires and will eventually plug off the stack, pushing all that smoke out the front of the stove with a bunch of carbon monoxide. We learned the hard way but fortunately had CO detectors.
 
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