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Shore Anchoring Conditions Question

TroutScout

New Member
I have a houseboat rental booked for July and was wondering if the low water level will prevent me from finding a sandy beach to anchor?
Will the shoreline be mucky or walkable?
 

Dmorty

Active Member
Always available beach somewhere regardless of lake level. As water drops making some unreachable, it is exposing more that was submerged. And vice versa when lake level is on the rise! Will be muddy down near water level and drier the higher you go. Just don’t walk the beach without protection on your feet from the mussels.
 

Ed_on_WD

Well-Known Member
Wave action, and even wind, tend to move sand downward. It's been my experience that the real mucky stuff, the mud that takes the shoes off your feet, tends to be located at the end of canyons, where flowing streams have brought more organic material into the deltas where the water is really shallow. Those are the spots where you find yourself sunk to your hips when you jump off the boat.
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
Echoing what the others have said. But what is also true is that if the land on shore is pretty flat or a shallow gradient, you can guess so is the beach below your boat, and those are the places that you tend to get hung up on, especially true if the lake is dropping. That's often the case in the back of the larger bays, like Warm Creek, Gunsight or others, especially where drainages enter the bay or along the margins, as Ed says. But as Dmorty said, that condition would be true regardless of lake level, it just happens in different places.

What is also true that the higher the clay content (and think Chinle formation, like you find in the neighborhood of the Rincon for example), then a very shallow beach is the kind that your houseboat will stick to like superglue. Good luck getting it off that stuff...

I personally like a smaller beach frontage (or even a gravel beach) at a steeper spot, where the water is clear and deep. And you can find that at any lake level if you do some scouting.
 

bubba

Well-Known Member
I spend a lot of time on the lake and I have never not been able to find a great spot to camp. My list of qualifiers is not short, so others will find even more spots than me. I am critical with water exposure, I always anchor in small calm coves to stay away from big storm waves. I stay away from green bushes as that is where the bugs are and the mice and the snakes. I do not like busy areas or to be near other boats so I seek isolated quite spots. I always point into the wind. During cooler months I anchor with a low east side to get the sun working quick in the morning. In the summer I always have a high west side to get early afternoon shade. I like deep water to allow easy exit without getting a free lesson in surface tension. I do not like lots of sand on the slopes above the bow when the wind picks up so slick rock meadows are preferred. I do like deep white sand for the hull, but no black sand at all. Full moon will also mean I must be in an area to experience the outline of the cliffs and ridge lines. No wild horses either. And I must have cell signal. That’s about it.

You will not have any problem finding a spot
 

ScottF

Well-Known Member
I spend a lot of time on the lake and I have never not been able to find a great spot to camp. My list of qualifiers is not short, so others will find even more spots than me. I am critical with water exposure, I always anchor in small calm coves to stay away from big storm waves. I stay away from green bushes as that is where the bugs are and the mice and the snakes. I do not like busy areas or to be near other boats so I seek isolated quite spots. I always point into the wind. During cooler months I anchor with a low east side to get the sun working quick in the morning. In the summer I always have a high west side to get early afternoon shade. I like deep water to allow easy exit without getting a free lesson in surface tension. I do not like lots of sand on the slopes above the bow when the wind picks up so slick rock meadows are preferred. I do like deep white sand for the hull, but no black sand at all. Full moon will also mean I must be in an area to experience the outline of the cliffs and ridge lines. No wild horses either. And I must have cell signal. That’s about it.

You will not have any problem finding a spot
bubba, I like your list of things to look for in a beach. I thought my requirements were high!

It reminds me of the line from Pride and Prejudice when Elizabeth responds to Darcy's definition of an accomplished woman - "I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any."
 
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JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
bubba, I like your list of things to look for in a beach. I thought my requirements were high!

It reminds me of the line from Pride and Prejudice when Elizabeth responds to Darcy's definition of an accomplished woman - "I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any."
Always good to add a little literary sophistication to the discourse... :)
 

gznokes

Well-Known Member
bubba, I like your list of things to look for in a beach. I thought my requirements were high!

It reminds me of the line from Pride and Prejudice when Elizabeth responds to Darcy's definition of an accomplished woman - "I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any."
. . .Did you really just drop a Pride and Prejudice reference on a fishing forum. . . You are a confident man 🤦‍♂️
 

gznokes

Well-Known Member
Echoing what the others have said. But what is also true is that if the land on shore is pretty flat or a shallow gradient, you can guess so is the beach below your boat, and those are the places that you tend to get hung up on, especially true if the lake is dropping. That's often the case in the back of the larger bays, like Warm Creek, Gunsight or others, especially where drainages enter the bay or along the margins, as Ed says. But as Dmorty said, that condition would be true regardless of lake level, it just happens in different places.

What is also true that the higher the clay content (and think Chinle formation, like you find in the neighborhood of the Rincon for example), then a very shallow beach is the kind that your houseboat will stick to like superglue. Good luck getting it off that stuff...

I personally like a smaller beach frontage (or even a gravel beach) at a steeper spot, where the water is clear and deep. And you can find that at any lake level if you do some scouting.
I found the beaches this past week a little tricky in two regards.
1. Rock Creek Bay had some good looking spots but the ones we tried had a lot of clay. I’d never been up there until this week but it was a combination of soft/sticky/messy and sink up to the knees in places.
2. We left and tried Dungeon Canyon and it had some flats that seemed great but when the wind would blow it would pick up lake bed particle dust like crazy—even more than normal Powell sand. We ejected on that as well. Granted we were shore camping and a houseboat can be easier, bc you don’t need a place to pitch a tent, but I thought I’d mention it.
 
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