Question For Utah Wordlings

Status
Not open for further replies.

Bill Sampson

Well-Known Member
I am considering retiring in 1 year and possibly settling down in Cedar City Utah. My question is: Does Utah salt their roads in the winter time? In California we use cinder which seems to be easier on vehicles. I don't want to replace a vehicle every 5 years due to rust. Any information you can supply would be appreciated.
Thanks,
 

Dungee Fishing

Well-Known Member
Not sure if we use it exclusively but it certainly is used, cant say I've ever had to replace a car because of rust from it though.
 

scouse

Member
When we lived in South Bend for two winters we vehicles had their under carriages sealed to prevent rust. Got out of there as quick as we could so do not know what the long term effects would have been.
Eight foot icicles from the roof to the ground...no fun!
 

Shuttle91

Member
The answer to your salt worries will be found in St. George Utah. It is only 45 minutes from Cedar City and it only snows maybe a handful of times each year. Even then the snow almost never sticks. Plus, you can fish in the winter at Sand Hollow or Quail.
 

Ryan

Well-Known Member
So I don’t live in Utah but I travel there frequently for work.

I’m not sure what they use to treat the roads during the dreaded “w” season but I do know that it isn’t hard on the vehicles.

I travel through Iowa and Nebraska as well. I see rust on most vehicles there. It is rare to see rust in Utah.
 

Endurance

Well-Known Member
As a lifelong Utahn, I can answer that Utah highway crews salt. A lot. There was a day when that was important. As a child in the 60s and 70s, I remember seeing a lot of cars, particularly Hondas and Subarus, with a lot of "body cancer." If you're driving a classic car, this will matter a lot. But today's cars are so much better that I really don't think of it any more. I typically hold onto my cars until they're 15 to 20 years old and haven't seen a bit of rust on any of them for years.

I am currently driving a 2003 Toyota Sequoia.. It gets all the winter driving because it goes better in the snow than my other cars. I usually drive it snow skiing about once a week this time of year. Even though this car is turning 15 this year, there isn't even a hint of body rust.

The closest thing I have experienced to body rust in the past 30 years is called rail dust. So-called because it started out being associated with steel train wheels running on steel tracks and giving off little bits of metal that land on other surfaces then rust. In Utah, we get a fair amount of "rail dust" from snowplows scraping along the streets and abrading the steel blade on the pavement. When you see a snowplow at night, you will sometimes even see sparks. Those bits of metal can end up on your car's paint and don't like to come off with normal car washing. The way to tell if you have rail dust as opposed to a rusting car is that with rail dust, you have the same amount of rust specs on plastic car parts as you have on metal. While I try to get rail dust off of my cars for cosmetic reasons, I don't worry about it eating through the paint or anything like that.

Unless your daily driver is older than about 20 years old, I would say "welcome to Utah!"
 
Last edited:

Ryan

Well-Known Member
@Endurance , I used to think just like you. Rust is a thing of the past.

I can tell you with certainty, it is not. I am typing from Omaha. Tons of cars with rust issues. I looked at a 3 year old Cadillac Escalade two years ago that was an Iowa car. I didn't buy it because the bottom was covered with rust, and you could see it coming through the wheel wells.

Whatever Utah uses, it is different/better than the mid-west.
 

BartsPlace

Moderator
Staff member
I think part of the Utah secret is lower humidity year round. It's humid when it rains and that's about it. As long as you wash the salt off of your car occasionally, the rust seems to develop substantially slower than in humid climates. Just my own experience.
 

Bill Sampson

Well-Known Member
As a lifelong Utahn, I can answer that Utah highway crews salt. A lot. There was a day when that was important. As a child in the 60s and 70s, I remember seeing a lot of cars, particularly Hondas and Subarus, with a lot of "body cancer." If you're driving a classic car, this will matter a lot. But today's cars are so much better that I really don't think of it any more. I typically hold onto my cars until they're 15 to 20 years old and haven't seen a bit of rust on any of them for years.

I am currently driving a 2003 Toyota Sequoia.. It gets all the winter driving because it goes better in the snow than my other cars. I usually drive it snow skiing about once a week this time of year. Even though this car is turning 15 this year, there isn't even a hint of body rust.

The closest thing I have experienced to body rust in the past 30 years is called rail dust. So-called because it started out being associated with steel train wheels running on steel tracks and giving off little bits of metal that land on other surfaces then rust. In Utah, we get a fair amount of "rail dust" from snowplows scraping along the streets and abrading the steel blade on the pavement. When you see a snowplow at night, you will sometimes even see sparks. Those bits of metal can end up on your car's paint and don't like to come off with normal car washing. The way to tell if you have rail dust as opposed to a rusting car is that with rail dust, you have the same amount of rust specs on plastic car parts as you have on metal. While I try to get rail dust off of my cars for cosmetic reasons, I don't worry about it eating through the paint or anything like that.

Unless your daily driver is older than about 20 years old, I would say "welcome to Utah!"
Thank you for this information.
 

Ryan

Well-Known Member
Just for fun snapped a few photos today in the parking lot.

Chevy Silverado. Newer than 2007 I believe.


Honda CRV. Probably 2002ish.


Another Chevy. I thought it was a Cobalt.
 

shoe

Member
Looks like the third picture appears to be a Mazda. Not a Chevy Cobalt. You can tell by the Mazda symbol on the rims.
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Southern Utah is great, the fishing offers so many species if you are willing to travel a bit. I have a summer place in the Duck Creek area, about 40 miles east of Cedar City and consider myself to be in fishing heaven. Don't worry about the rust cause we leave by mid-November. Any area from St.George to Cedar City is nice but St. George is a little hot for my blood and even Cedar City gets to be 100 degrees fairly often but the fishing opportunities are nearly endless Brookies to Pike to Stripers within range. 10 pound trout to large mouth. Gotta love it. I'll wash my vehicle more often for the chance to fish this wonderful area.
I am considering retiring in 1 year and possibly settling down in Cedar City Utah. My question is: Does Utah salt their roads in the winter time? In California we use cinder which seems to be easier on vehicles. I don't want to replace a vehicle every 5 years due to rust. Any information you can supply would be appreciated.
Thanks,
 

Dale

Well-Known Member
Ryan,
Sorry you are in Omaha. Left that Godforsaken place in 1971. Maybe you should think about Central Arizona. At 5500 feet we get a little snow, pretty and it melts by noon, 6 high country trout fishing lakes, and world class bass fishing all within a 1 hour drive, and Powell is only 3 and a half hours away!
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Ryan,
Sorry you are in Omaha. Left that Godforsaken place in 1971. Maybe you should think about Central Arizona. At 5500 feet we get a little snow, pretty and it melts by noon, 6 high country trout fishing lakes, and world class bass fishing all within a 1 hour drive, and Powell is only 3 and a half hours away!
Where is central az are ya? At 5500 feet sounds like Prescott.
 

Dale

Well-Known Member
Pine, almost the exact geographic center of AZ. quiet little community, but only an hour and a half from Phoenix, Flagstaff, Prescott. Less than 2 hours from Sky Harbor. Walmart superstore only 15 miles away in Payson! Big pine trees, and not the wind of Prescott or Flag! Pretty close to heaven!
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Have been there, very nice area. Don't think you are too far from the old John Wayne ranch. Mogollon rim not to far away if I remember right. Used to be able to drive down to the Verde River from up there I think.
 

Sasquatch

Well-Known Member
If I crane my head to the right while sitting in my office I can see up your way but Straight ahead is the Red Rocks of Sedona , makes me want to go fishing!
 

Dale

Well-Known Member
Have been there, very nice area. Don't think you are too far from the old John Wayne ranch. Mogollon rim not to far away if I remember right. Used to be able to drive down to the Verde River from up there I think.

We look straight up to the Mogollon Rim from the valley directly below! Don't know about John Wayne, but Zane Grey wrote most of his books in his cabin under the Rim, It burned in the 1992 Dude fire, but a replica is at the Green Valley Park in Payson. The East Verde River starts just under the Rim, and flows into the Verde near the old sheep bridge above Horseshoe.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top