New to jet skis and have a question

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
Hey guys. I have a GTX 1100 d.i. jet ski and have a silly question that a family member asked that wants to borrow it.

Will a jet ski make it from Bullfrog to Dangling Rope on a single tank of gas or will extra gas need to be carried? I really don't know as I've only played in BF bay with it.
 

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
Every jet ski is different. The question should be - How big is the gas tank and how much fuel does it use??
This is true, I know that. It is an 1100 cc 2 stroke. Just wondering if others have made the trip on their skis and and did they make it on one tank or need more.

I would have to ultimately have to make that decision with my certain machine but hoping for some infinite wisdom/experiences this forum always seems to provide. ;)

Full speed, it would be an hour or so to get down there ASAP. My mind set says you should get more than an hour out of a tank, but being a mechanic, I don't always see eye-to-eye with the engineers thinkings. haha
 

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
Just one rider.

Bart, That is an AWESOME link. Thank you! Saving it! maybe be useful for any future customer questions.

I may send a 1 gallon can and 1 quart of oil, just in case. A lot cheaper than towing services from DR to BF. :)

But since I have never had it full throttle, 55 seems far fetched. I've had it to 36 but never been on glass with it either.

I might make a run before family does. Maybe just an excuse to play on the jet ski? haha........MAYBE!!!
 

nzaugg

Member
We were able to make it from Bullfrog to Davis Gulch and about half way back, but it was in the 4-stroke version with a 15 gallon tank and was definitely not running full throttle. It would seem be an iffy proposition trying to get it to DR. Towing from Slickrock to Halls only to find Halls on winter hours 3 days after Labor Day was not fun either.
 

stevenk2

Well-Known Member
Not apples-to-apples here, but we have a 2017 Kawasaki STX-15F (4-cyl/4 stroke, naturally aspirated), and I can go a LOT farther on a tank keeping it around 30-35 MPH than my son can when he's out messing around on it at full throttle. He'll burn through a tank of gas in a couple of hours, where I can make a tank last all day if I'm careful. It just depends on the way you ride it - off and on the throttle all the time with blasts at WOT will go through fuel faster than maintaining a steady slower speed. (All of which is not to say that I haven't messed around on it from time to time, because I do - just not all day like he does.)

Wish I could provide you with some actual mileage figures, but I've never really kept close track of that per se. And again, not necessarily a direct comparison, since you have a SeaDoo.
 

Dave I.

Well-Known Member
The funny thing is that family says they want to do it full throttle. I can't imagine they will make the 40+ miles very comfortably and it wouldn't be enjoyable in my opinion. I think they will get a maximum of half way and then say that is enough. haha....Unless it's glass the entire way. haha

They want to do the DR run but I keep telling them they should just explore the North end of the lake.
 

stevenk2

Well-Known Member
The funny thing is that family says they want to do it full throttle. I can't imagine they will make the 40+ miles very comfortably and it wouldn't be enjoyable in my opinion. I think they will get a maximum of half way and then say that is enough. haha....Unless it's glass the entire way. haha

They want to do the DR run but I keep telling them they should just explore the North end of the lake.
If it's their first time doing it, tell them to take it easy on the inbound leg to DR, see where the fuel level is at on arrival, then top off before the return leg. The fuel level on the inbound leg should tell them what they need to do on the return leg of the trip. That being said, given the availability of fuel on the lake (or lack thereof depending on location), they may still want to take it easy on the return leg, at least until they're closer to home. If they're getting close and still have sufficient fuel, then they could let 'er rip.
 

stevenk2

Well-Known Member
The times we've been down there, we see an awful lot of PWCs being towed by houseboats - I suspect that's how most of them make it to the far reaches of the lake. Don't know how many brave souls make those trips on PWCs alone - in my personal experience on bodies of water far smaller than LP, rough water gets old real quick, especially during long hauls. It's fun when you're just playing around for short periods of time, but when you're trying to go in a straight line at any kind of speed to get somewhere, it's pretty hard on the legs, back and butt.
 
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