Last Chance Bay Afternoon Anchoring Recommendations

Bill Sampson

Well-Known Member
I am planning a trip for July 10th to the 16th. The last night, July 15th I plan on anchoring my 65 foot houseboat in Last Chance Bay, as I always have. The difference this year is I have no anchoring site experienced people on the trip. Two years ago I tried to make this work, and our last night in Last Chance was a windy and rainy nightmare. Since we begin that morning at Great Bend on the San Juan, we don't get to Last Chance until 2:30 to 3:00 o'clock. I need some possible afternoon spots to anchor with reasonable wind protection. Birdsnest mentioned anchoring on the west side which makes sense to me since we got hammered on the east side 2 years ago. We usually tie off to large boulders.
I know this as all speculation assuming a spot is available, but anything you can offer would be appreciated. Based on the difficulty getting friends to go, this will probably be my last houseboat trip to the lake, so I want it to end well.
Thanks in advance.
 

PowellBride

Well-Known Member
Watch the weather forecasts and head to Last Chance a day early if it makes a difference in the weather?

I feel for you with putting together a group for the trip. My husband and I are on the cusp of being able to make more trips than our normal crew can. We either need to stay in the slip (YUCK!!!!) or we're going to need some new Powell friends. We have 1 Wordling (Squirrel) who may be interested in joining our future trips, but I'm short summer crew and that is not his favorite time on the lake.

One way we've been able to speed up the anchoring process was to add "guidelines" for the 1st 2 anchor ropes on shore. Although we send a scout boat 1 - 2 hours ahead of the houseboat to set 2 of the anchor lines, it was still a slow process. The anchor line had to be handed from shore to the front deck, then to someone on the top deck, who had to maneuver around the tiny lip around the fly bridge, then walk the line to the back of the top deck and hand it down to someone on the back deck to tie off. With the guideline, we make a loop at the end of the anchor rope, with a carabiner attached. Then we snap a carabiner from the guideline to the anchor line and simply pull it in from the back deck cleat. Getting that first line tied off on each side sure does lower the stress level.

Once you find a spot can you idle the HB at your destination while your crew sets the 1st 2 anchors - at least you won't be trying to keep the boat onshore during the process.
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
Watch the weather forecasts and head to Last Chance a day early if it makes a difference in the weather?

I feel for you with putting together a group for the trip. My husband and I are on the cusp of being able to make more trips than our normal crew can. We either need to stay in the slip (YUCK!!!!) or we're going to need some new Powell friends. We have 1 Wordling (Squirrel) who may be interested in joining our future trips, but I'm short summer crew and that is not his favorite time on the lake.

One way we've been able to speed up the anchoring process was to add "guidelines" for the 1st 2 anchor ropes on shore. Although we send a scout boat 1 - 2 hours ahead of the houseboat to set 2 of the anchor lines, it was still a slow process. The anchor line had to be handed from shore to the front deck, then to someone on the top deck, who had to maneuver around the tiny lip around the fly bridge, then walk the line to the back of the top deck and hand it down to someone on the back deck to tie off. With the guideline, we make a loop at the end of the anchor rope, with a carabiner attached. Then we snap a carabiner from the guideline to the anchor line and simply pull it in from the back deck cleat. Getting that first line tied off on each side sure does lower the stress level.

Once you find a spot can you idle the HB at your destination while your crew sets the 1st 2 anchors - at least you won't be trying to keep the boat onshore during the process.
Bride, can't you cleat the rope you're using for the anchor line to a bow and aft cleat before the beach and the then undo the front cleat when you get to the beach, leaving the aft secured until the length is figured out then let out rope from the rear. Don't know how the side of your boat is configured but the rope on the side shouldn't hinder travel.
 

PowellBride

Well-Known Member
We could, but this way the hard part (IMHO) is done before we get to the beach with the HB. 2 anchor lines are already wrapped around boulders and secured, with the ropes coiled where the nose will beach. All that's left to do is tie it to a cleat. To me that is quicker, than trying to walk the line on an unpredictable shoreline after the HB is onshore, trying to stay straight against winds and waves. Also when my crew is out the on the less than stable rocks they aren't feeling compelled to "hurry".
 

birdsnest

Well-Known Member
We could, but this way the hard part (IMHO) is done before we get to the beach with the HB. 2 anchor lines are already wrapped around boulders and secured, with the ropes coiled where the nose will beach. All that's left to do is tie it to a cleat. To me that is quicker, than trying to walk the line on an unpredictable shoreline after the HB is onshore, trying to stay straight against winds and waves. Also when my crew is out the on the less than stable rocks they aren't feeling compelled to "hurry".
I get it, thanks for the xplainin.
 

cfulton

Well-Known Member
I carry 6 pieces of 50' braided anchor line. The scout boat, which is always me and one other male, finds the spot and selects the boulders to tie to. Tie them around boulders before the HB arrives. We talk to the houseboat on the radio and direct it to the bow position on shore. The HB driver holds the HB straight with the bow on the beach, using power to hold the proper angle until the upwind side is fully secured. Our shore lines are attached to the HB cleats. I have built six what I call "flying cleats" which snap onto the boulder ropes giving us a cleat to use rather than some fancy knot...even rookies can do a cleat. Then we simply cleat the HBs shore line to the flying cleats. Easy to adjust or take up slack. Takes much less time than using anchors and is 1/3 the work....more secure too. We use 3 lines on each side--two off the last two cleats on the HB and one off the bow-each side.
Chuck
 

PowellBride

Well-Known Member
I carry 6 pieces of 50' braided anchor line. The scout boat, which is always me and one other male, finds the spot and selects the boulders to tie to. Tie them around boulders before the HB arrives. We talk to the houseboat on the radio and direct it to the bow position on shore. The HB driver holds the HB straight with the bow on the beach, using power to hold the proper angle until the upwind side is fully secured. Our shore lines are attached to the HB cleats. I have built six what I call "flying cleats" which snap onto the boulder ropes giving us a cleat to use rather than some fancy knot...even rookies can do a cleat. Then we simply cleat the HBs shore line to the flying cleats. Easy to adjust or take up slack. Takes much less time than using anchors and is 1/3 the work....more secure too. We use 3 lines on each side--two off the last two cleats on the HB and one off the bow-each side.
Chuck
Similar to We have a friend that bought a range of 20' - 50' heavy weight tie down straps. They wrap these around a boulder and hook the ends together with a shackle. When the HB arrives the anchor rope is attached to the tie down shackle with a second shackle and then tightened. If I was sure I'd have insurance for the next 3 - 5 years, we'd probably invest in the straps ourselves
 
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