Lake Powell's oldest fish

Status
Not open for further replies.

DreamWeaver

Active Member
Spent the last 3 weeks documenting trace fossils at the Lake. Discovered several blocks containing fish fossils in remarkably well preserved condition. The strata they are in dates back to the late Triassic probably 205 - 210 million years old. Perhaps I should have posted this on the fishing forum.....IMG_4525.jpg
IMG_4526.jpg
IMG_4530.jpg
 

Attachments

  • IMG_4535.jpg
    IMG_4535.jpg
    332.3 KB · Views: 47

Shuttle91

Member
That is incredible that something that lived so long ago is still preserved for us to enjoy today. You definitely hold the record for capturing and recording the oldest fish on the lake. I don't know anything about fossils but is that the actual scales of the fish or minerals that replaced the scales maybe just a few million years after the thing died?
 

DreamWeaver

Active Member
That is incredible that something that lived so long ago is still preserved for us to enjoy today. You definitely hold the record for capturing and recording the oldest fish on the lake. I don't know anything about fossils but is that the actual scales of the fish or minerals that replaced the scales maybe just a few million years after the thing died?
Good question about the scales. We find teeth and bones in the same strata that seem to be the original material. Whether scales can also survive in their original state is beyond my pay grade. In a nutshell...... I don't know.
 

Waterbaby

Moderator
Staff member
Good question about the scales. We find teeth and bones in the same strata that seem to be the original material. Whether scales can also survive in their original state is beyond my pay grade. In a nutshell...... I don't know.


Actually this is the right place for this post - and very interesting. It seems when something dies it does leave behind the impression if left undisturbed for a length of time. Case in point a Facebook acquaintance who does home repairs/restorations recently had a home where someone died on a cement floor and was not found right away - the complete outline of the body is etched into the floor, in detail, rivaling many deteriorating photographs, he took a photo and posted it since it was so unusual - but I thought of it reading your post. Some sort of chemical reaction must take place if a body decomposes in place undisturbed, so same must apply to any living thing, including a fish.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top