Lake Powell How To Series Thread

Pyropugilist

New Member
I know you have a lot to cover. But on down the line it might be helpful for newbies like me if you made a short lisT of things to take when you dry camp on the lake. And maybe also how to keep your fillets fresh on a three or four day trip. My first trip to Powelll will be next month and these first three episodes have been very helpful. Thank you so much
 

CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
I know you have a lot to cover. But on down the line it might be helpful for newbies like me if you made a short lisT of things to take when you dry camp on the lake. And maybe also how to keep your fillets fresh on a three or four day trip. My first trip to Powelll will be next month and these first three episodes have been very helpful. Thank you so much
Here is ours (we don’t pack light) and we dont take all this unless we’re camping 4 or more days in a row.

The secret to keeping your fillets fresh is immediately putting caught fish under ice, fillet them ASAP (always the same day as catching), rinse with fresh water and vacuum bag, then return to the bottom of a very icy cooler. Do this in shade or after sun sets.

Plan on returning to Antelope, Wahweap, Dangling Rope, or Bullfrog every third day for ice.

LAKE POWELL PACKING LIST:

Boat:
  1. Tools & duct tape
  2. Extra transom plugs and boxend wrench
  3. VHF radio and charger with boat adapter
  4. Fish-Finder
  5. GPS module with suction holder
  6. Fishing poles
  7. Tackle boxes
  8. Gear Box
  9. Gear Bag
  10. Boat Shoes
  11. Carbon fiber cooler (food)
  12. 1 gallon bottle of water
  13. White fish cooler
  14. Larger cooler for swim platform (Yeti for ice)
  15. Parachute lightweight blankets (2)
  16. rTic cups, bottles, etc.
  17. Extra towels
  18. Whistle, med kit, life jackets, air horn, toss-able float
  19. Registration and insurance paperwork
  20. Emergency contacts on laminated sheet
  21. ResQLink global GPS emergency transponder
  22. Nesso shade and poles
  23. Alligator clamps (use to clamp shade on boat for the sunny afternoons)
  24. Sun screen
  25. 5 gallon Gas can filled with regular
  26. Anchor-Buddy! (Cool contraption to allow "offshore" anchor, so you can pull the boat in with a land line)
Personal:
  1. Glasses
  2. Jacket
  3. Fishing Shirts
  4. Shorts
  5. Swim suit
  6. Track pants
  7. Underwear
  8. Socks
  9. Bathroom pack and medicine
  10. Hikers/Shoes/Flip-flops/water shoes
  11. Butt Wipes
  12. Hand sanitizer
Tech:
  1. GoPro 6 & 7 with cases, mounts, etc.
  2. Camera(s) with lenses and tripod
  3. Charging equipment (Multi-outlet) and mini USB cables
  4. Anker Battery packs (20,000mA) with iPhone lightning cables
  5. Drone kit
  6. iPad
  7. Cigarette lighter multi outlet with 4 USB ports + alligator-clip to cigarette adapter
Camping: (pack inside the large black bins with yellow tops from Costco)
  1. Tent
  2. Ground Tarp with stakes and clips to fasten tiedowns
  3. Extra para-cord with adjusters
  4. Package of large zip ties
  5. Scissors, large knife (K-Bar), hatchet with hammer on back
  6. Cots x 2 (with feet and organizers) or air mattresses
  7. Sleeping bags
  8. Camp pillows
  9. Neso Shade/Shelter with extra poles
  10. Camp stove and gas canisters (or electric cooker if preferred, with generator)
  11. Matches, lighter, etc
  12. Red 5 gal gas can
  13. Generator
  14. Spare car battery with solar panel to charge during day (quiet power at night)
  15. Camp tables (fold-up ones with aluminum slats)
  16. Camp cooking pans, spatula, wooden spoon
  17. Aluminum foil and Saran Wrap
  18. Gallon and sandwich size ziplock bags,
  19. food prep supplies (knife, etc) and cleanup (dish soap, hand soap)
  20. Paper plates, napkins, plastic utensils, solo cups
  21. Cutting board and cafeteria style serving trays
  22. Expandable pop up camp garbage container
  23. Rolls of paper towels
  24. Sand anchors (bags to fill) and tie/weight down everything for wind
  25. Beach Spike
  26. Toilet lid for poop bucket
  27. Sealable Shit bags for poop bucket
  28. 5 gallon Home Depot poop bucket (orange)
  29. As much ice as will fit in the coolers
  30. Camp chairs
  31. Large black garbage bags
  32. Firewood if you want, or bring axe to chop driftwood
  33. Band aids, tweezers, floss, neosporin, alcohol wipes
  34. Headlamp and extra spotlight with spare batteries
Water Sports:
  1. SUPS paddles and pump
  2. Water skis & rope
  3. Wake Board & rope
  4. Life jackets
  5. Gloves
  6. Helmets
Food and Water:
  1. Loaf of Bread
  2. Sandwich meat
  3. Miracle Whip
  4. American cheese
  5. Pickle slices
  6. 18 Eggs pre-cracked into a 1litre container
  7. Frozen tater tots
  8. Bacon
  9. Frozen bag of mixed veggies
  10. Salt and pepper
  11. Vegetable oil
  12. Butter or margarine
  13. Fish-fry flour and milk
  14. Large package of water bottles or 2 x 2.5 gallon containers and tumblers
  15. Whatever else you prefer to drink...
  16. Extra cash ($200) for gas, emergency bribes, etc.
  17. Snacks, chips, jerky, apples, etc things that don’t require fridge or cool
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Dungee Fishing

Well-Known Member
I know you have a lot to cover. But on down the line it might be helpful for newbies like me if you made a short lisT of things to take when you dry camp on the lake. And maybe also how to keep your fillets fresh on a three or four day trip. My first trip to Powelll will be next month and these first three episodes have been very helpful. Thank you so much
Thanks! Yes, a packing list/video is on tap.

Along with Chris’ post a good starting point is from this link on the old site.

 

Wet1

Well-Known Member
I know you have a lot to cover. But on down the line it might be helpful for newbies like me if you made a short list of things to take when you dry camp on the lake. And maybe also how to keep your fillets fresh on a three or four day trip. My first trip to Powelll will be next month and these first three episodes have been very helpful. Thank you so much
Camping gear is all based on personal preferences. I know some people who go minimalist and sleep on the boat and others that try to be as comfortable as they would at home. I'm basically in the middle. Tent with cots and sleeping pads. I do several 4 and 5 day trips each year to the north end where you're not going to run back 35 miles down lake to get more ice and gas.
I have a 20 foot Lund and I've found that the way I run the throttle makes a big difference on fuel economy. That said for a 5 day trip I take and additional 20 gal of fuel for the boat and 5 gal for the generator. I run the generator every night to recharge my boat batteries after full day of fishing. I also use it to run the electric fillet knife and make coffee with a drip coffee maker in the mornings.
Regarding keeping your fish fresh, it all depends on what you're catching. If you're after stripers they don't survive very long in a livewell and if you're catching a bunch of them you're going to burn through ice throwing them in a cooler in the boat. I personally don't target stripers but focus more on walleye, bass, and crappie. I put these in the livewell and fillet them every night. After rinsing them I put the fillets in 1 gal ziplocks with some salt, and a major ice saving trick I've learned is to fill them with the melted ice water from the cooler rather than putting warm water from the jug in it and then throwing that in a cooler. The other trick to save ice is to keep keep your coolers on the north side of your tent and cover with a tarp during the day.

If temps are going to be above 70 deg I pre-chill everything in the fridge before loading into the coolers at the last minute. I usually stop at the last place I can on the way down with a store to load them with ice, usually Price for me. I segregate the coolers with one for food only, another for drinks only, and a third for food and drinks in the boat. These 3 coolers take care of 2 to 3 people for the trip. After they are topped off with ice I'll buy a pound or 2 of dry ice and after breaking it up distribute among the 3 coolers. This eliminates any ice loss initially and super cools the coolers down. The ice is usually still crisp and hasn't started to melt throughout the first day when we do this.
 
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Bill Sampson

Well-Known Member
Here is ours (we don’t pack light) and we dont take all this unless we’re camping 4 or more days in a row.

The secret to keeping your fillets fresh is immediately putting caught fish under ice, fillet them ASAP (always the same day as catching), rinse with fresh water and vacuum bag, then return to the bottom of a very icy cooler. Do this in shade or after sun sets.

Plan on returning to Antelope, Wahweap, Dangling Rope, or Bullfrog every third day for ice.

LAKE POWELL PACKING LIST:

Boat:
  1. Tools & duct tape
  2. Extra transom plugs and boxend wrench
  3. VHF radio and charger with boat adapter
  4. Fish-Finder
  5. GPS module with suction holder
  6. Fishing poles
  7. Tackle boxes
  8. Gear Box
  9. Gear Bag
  10. Boat Shoes
  11. Carbon fiber cooler (food)
  12. 1 gallon bottle of water
  13. White fish cooler
  14. Larger cooler for swim platform (Yeti for ice)
  15. Parachute lightweight blankets (2)
  16. rTic cups, bottles, etc.
  17. Extra towels
  18. Whistle, med kit, life jackets, air horn, toss-able float
  19. Registration and insurance paperwork
  20. Emergency contacts on laminated sheet
  21. ResQLink global GPS emergency transponder
  22. Nesso shade and poles
  23. Alligator clamps (use to clamp shade on boat for the sunny afternoons)
  24. Sun screen
  25. 5 gallon Gas can filled with regular
Personal:
  1. Glasses
  2. Jacket
  3. Fishing Shirts
  4. Shorts
  5. Swim suit
  6. Track pants
  7. Underwear
  8. Socks
  9. Bathroom pack and medicine
  10. Hikers/Shoes/Flip-flops/water shoes
  11. Butt Wipes
  12. Hand sanitizer
Tech:
  1. GoPro 6 & 7 with cases, mounts, etc.
  2. Camera(s) with lenses and tripod
  3. Charging equipment (Multi-outlet) and mini USB cables
  4. Anker Battery packs (20,000mA) with iPhone lightning cables
  5. Drone kit
  6. iPad
  7. Cigarette lighter multi outlet with 4 USB ports + alligator-clip to cigarette adapter
Camping: (pack inside the large black bins with yellow tops from Costco)
  1. Tent
  2. Ground Tarp with stakes and clips to fasten tiedowns
  3. Extra para-cord with adjusters
  4. Package of large zip ties
  5. Scissors, large knife (K-Bar), hatchet with hammer on back
  6. Cots x 2 (with feet and organizers) or air mattresses
  7. Sleeping bags
  8. Camp pillows
  9. Neso Shade/Shelter with extra poles
  10. Camp stove and gas canisters (or electric cooker if preferred, with generator)
  11. Matches, lighter, etc
  12. Red 5 gal gas can
  13. Generator
  14. Spare car battery with solar panel to charge during day (quiet power at night)
  15. Camp tables (fold-up ones with aluminum slats)
  16. Camp cooking pans, spatula, wooden spoon
  17. Aluminum foil and Saran Wrap
  18. Gallon and sandwich size ziplock bags,
  19. food prep supplies (knife, etc) and cleanup (dish soap, hand soap)
  20. Paper plates, napkins, plastic utensils, solo cups
  21. Cutting board and cafeteria style serving traysView attachment 4319
  22. Expandable pop up camp garbage container
  23. Rolls of paper towels
  24. Sand anchors (bags to fill) and tie/weight down everything for wind
  25. Beach Spike
  26. Toilet lid for poop bucket
  27. Sealable Shit bags for poop bucket
  28. 5 gallon Home Depot poop bucket (orange)
  29. As much ice as will fit in the coolers
  30. Camp chairs
  31. Large black garbage bags
  32. Firewood if you want, or bring axe to chop driftwood
  33. Band aids, tweezers, floss, neosporin, alcohol wipes
  34. Headlamp and extra spotlight with spare batteries
Water Sports:
  1. SUPS paddles and pump
  2. Water skis & rope
  3. Wake Board & rope
  4. Life jackets
  5. Gloves
  6. Helmets
Food and Water:
  1. Loaf of Bread
  2. Sandwich meat
  3. Miracle Whip
  4. American cheese
  5. Pickle slices
  6. 18 Eggs pre-cracked into a 1litre container
  7. Frozen tater tots
  8. Bacon
  9. Frozen bag of mixed veggies
  10. Salt and pepper
  11. Vegetable oil
  12. Butter or margarine
  13. Fish-fry flour and milk
  14. Large package of water bottles or 2 x 2.5 gallon containers and tumblers
  15. Whatever else you prefer to drink...
  16. Extra cash ($200) for gas, emergency bribes, etc.
  17. Snacks, chips, jerky, apples, etc things that don’t require fridge or cool
View attachment 4311
View attachment 4309View attachment 4310View attachment 4312
This is a good list. Thanks for sharing it.
 

CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
The opposite approach to my lengthy list above if you're minimalist or just don't have the time, money, or inclination to "glamp", is to camp on the boat.

You just bring a sleeping pad and sleeping bag, a couple pillows, your bathroom stuff, change of clothes, waterproof or resistant blanket (in case it rains, trust me you'll want to stay dry if possible...).

Other than that, you just bring your fishing stuff, fillet tools, and make due... we've done this several times and it's much less work, albeit "spartan" if you're doing it more than a couple days.

One more thing I forgot to mention that has become indispensable to us: An Anchor-Buddy... bungie anchor line that allows you to drop anchor about 75 feet offshore, back into the shoreline...quickly cutting engine and raising outdrive at the right moment, and coasting into shallow water just prior to the bungie pulling you back out. Meanwhile you hop off in 1-2 feet of water with a line tied to the boat, and go anchor it onshore somewhere.

This simple device (Anchor Buddy) will be the coolest thing you've ever seen. It allows you to anchor with the bow facing the inbound wakes and waves, keeps your boat off the rocky damaging shoreline, and allows you to easily use the beach anchor and line to easily bungie the boat in and out from the shoreline. If you're sleeping on the boat this is really nice because it keeps the boat off the shore (no pounding if there are waves) and if you're sleeping on shore in a tent it lets you keep your boat safely tied with two anchor points, off the shoreline which WILL damage your bow if you come in face first.
 

TPrice

Member
Holy smokes Chris! After studying your camping pics I noticed someone cooking on an electric skillet; my eyes nearly popped out! An electric skillet? Really? I had to go back and read your gear list again, and sure enough there it was - "(or electric cooker if preferred, with generator)". I am impressed. Really impressed. My historical thoughts of camping thirty miles from nowhere come from deep in the Boundary Waters where everything you take for a two week trip will fit in a canoe. Or packing in to the high country on horseback where true high-class is a wood stove and a wall tent.

Sandi and I have just recently discovered Lake Powell, and the remote camping opportunities it offers. I get the whole ice thing and I agree with the multiple ice chest thing. I am also a dry ice fan; you gotta keep the ice crisp and those fillets fresh. But I'm going to have to go back through your camping gear list compared to mine and rethink things a bit. The older I get, which I have now become, the more I really like your gear list. I'll think on your Anchor Buddy suggestion for a while, but the electric skillet, well, it is already on my list. ...got the generator, may as well have the skillet too.

Tim
 

Wet1

Well-Known Member
The generator allows us to put a pot roast, potatoes and carrots in the crock pot, and we have a nice supper waiting when we get back in the evening.
And the anchor buddy is the best
Now that's roughing it!!!! I use mine to make coffee every morning, run the fillet knife, and charge the boat batteries every night.
 

Dworwood

Well-Known Member
Chris, I guess it’s ok to just print your list? It is way better than my memory is any more. I used to get chastised for wanting to be comfortable but when it came time to sit in a chair or eat it seems like my camp was pretty popular ! Nice list, thanks for sharing.
 
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CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
I want to camp with Treetop! Roast and taters for dinner?? ON THE LAKE?? That's my kind of camping! :)
When we bring the generator, we use an 11" electric skillet vs the small gas stove because it cooks WAY faster, and won't blow out in the wind.


We use it in our RV too, and love it.

As a bonus, the non-stick surface in this Presto seems to be the best non-stick of any surface we've ever seen.

Literally nothing will stick to it (not even overcooked eggs).
 

Pyropugilist

New Member
Next one is done. Just going to post all of them here instead of creating a new thread each every time.
My wife and I are headed down tomorrow for our first time I'm really glad I found your videos they should help us out a lot. For the first time we're staying at the motel at bullfrog just to check out the area and hopefully will be doing some dry camping next time. Thank you everyone who posted On this thread and answered my questions. We are going to keep it simple and stay in the bullfrog in the halls Crossing area this first time. I know it's going to be harder to find fish after this cold front but we're looking forward to trying. Thanks for helping the newbie.
 
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Pyropugilist

New Member
My first trip to Lake Powell is under my belt. My wife and I made it simple, took our time and we caught a few fish. The guys at the fish cleaning station says our stripers were thin but all were over 20". Had a very good time and are already planning our next trip. Thanks everyone for the info. It helped a lot image.jpegfimage.jpeg
 
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