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Is this something they are going to start enforcing?

Fursniper

Well-Known Member
Hitting a sandstone torpedo can eject you from the boat. Having the steering linkage break allowing the engine to turn abruptly while the boat is on plane can eject you. So can catching a wave while turning at high speed. This video shows what happens if you get ejected and the engine kill switch is not used. It also shows the circling path of the watercraft with passengers in the water. How the boat was finally stopped was heroic.

 
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Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
So the guy that jumped on the boat was the original driver, right?

Interesting that the boat increased from 9mph to 30 mph on it’s own.

I didn’t think the driver had one of those auto inflate life jackets on - maybe it was under his coat? But it seemed to inflate and work okay.

Edit: The driver had a life vest on - it was black and hard to see.

Also: Apparently a classic case of distracted driving. He was playing with his screen and didn't see the buoy in time. The older guy was trying to signal him but at 52 mph the hand motions weren't enough (and yelling would have been futile). There was no wake the driver was dodging. Just a total self inflicted mistake.

One softsided tacklebox went overboard. I think it was floating for a while then?

He was off the boat for 11 minutes and 15 seconds based on the clock.

What is the white "slinky" in the bottom right of the screen supposed to represent?
 
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DeepVee

Well-Known Member
Hitting a sandstone torpedo can eject you from the boat. Having the steering linkage break allowing the engine to turn abruptly while the boat is on plane can eject you. So can catching a wave while turning at high speed. This video shows what happens if you get ejected and the engine kill switch is not used. It also shows the circling path of the watercraft with passengers in the water. How the boat was finally stopped was heroic.

Yeah that's my biggest concern, unforeseen underwater objects. We travel anywhere from 40-75 MPH in one of our boats and any of those speeds could eject occupants if things get bad. We've boated safely in fairly fast boats on Powell for over 20 years and we're finally adding Garmin equipment that will hopefully help us continue to avoid situations like that video, but it's a must to wear the lanyard in this boat.

We also have a pontoon boat on Powell and hit a low water spot with our out-drive last year while cruising around 20-MPH. The effect to the boat & occupants was fortunately minimal. Did my son have the lanyard on? No.
 

thekid26

Active Member
After heavy drinking, while blasting heavy metal music and simultaneously shooting off fireworks :ROFLMAO:
does anyone ever get in trouble for fireworks? it seems like every summer someone is having an amazing firework show and i never see anyone get in trouble, is it illegal but never enforced??
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
I talked with the NPS rangers about enforcement while on a GRIT trip a couple years ago. There are apparently two kinds of rangers, the public relations ones (the majority), who don’t enforce but try to provide information and resolve issues on the lake. Those are the ones on the GRIT trips and most of the others you see. When there’s a real problem, they’ll bring in the enforcement rangers. There’s just not many of them covering a huge area...
 
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