• Friends: Please double-check the email address you have on file. Make sure that it is current and able to receive email. When our emails are rejected it can damage our ratings and slow down future deliveries.
    Thanks!

Is this something they are going to start enforcing?

Havalina

Well-Known Member
I am not really sure how they would, they would need to observe you while the boat is on plane. Then there is the fact that they would need to enforce the rest of the boater laws as well i.e. wakeless speed within a 150’ of another vessel. This will probably be an add on charge for an injury accdent.

After reading Waynes post below and the article for a second time. I would just make sure that you have the little red bungie attached to the kill switch. Just like having your fire extinguisher, and throwable on board.
 
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wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
Here is what the original post was talking about: Click on the first link to learn more.




This section provides information on Engine Cut-off Switches and propeller safety for both the Recreational Boater and Manufacturers.​

On April 1, 2021 a new federal law goes into effect that requires the operator of a boat with an installed Engine Cut-Off Switch (ECOS) to use the ECOS link. The link is usually a coiled bungee cord lanyard clipped onto the operator's person, Personal Floatation Device (PFD) or clothing and the other end attached to the cut-off switch, but there are plenty of variations on the market, including electronic wireless devices. The law applies on all "Navigable Waters of the US".
 

Ed_on_WD

Member
Just asking for clarification here: If the vessel was MANUFACTURED with an ECOS, it MUST be used, right? They are not requiring that older vessels must be retrofitted with an ECOS, at least at this time?
For my September trip, one of my group will be bringing an older 14 foot aluminum boat with an outboard motor. He won't be turned back at the ramp for not having a functioning ECOS, right?
It would really be a bummer to find out at the last minute that he should have installed one prior to trying to launch.
Thanks!
 

wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
My understanding is, as of today, boats launching are not inspected. Only boats retrieved are inspected but that is only for quagga mussels. You are responsible that your boat is ready for travel and will provide safety for those on board while on the lake.
 

Ryan

Well-Known Member
I don't think it applies to Lake Powell.

What does navigable water mean?
Navigable waters of the United States are those waters that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide and/or are presently used, or have been used in the past, or may be susceptible for use to transport interstate or foreign commerce.
 

Dorado

Well-Known Member
Just asking for clarification here: If the vessel was MANUFACTURED with an ECOS, it MUST be used, right? They are not requiring that older vessels must be retrofitted with an ECOS, at least at this time?
For my September trip, one of my group will be bringing an older 14 foot aluminum boat with an outboard motor. He won't be turned back at the ramp for not having a functioning ECOS, right?
It would really be a bummer to find out at the last minute that he should have installed one prior to trying to launch.
Thanks!
Pretty sure they have been on all outboards for over 30 years. The coiled line is probably rotted away, but the little clip on the ignition cutoff is still probably there...
 

ralph

Member
I don't think it applies to Lake Powell.

What does navigable water mean?
Navigable waters of the United States are those waters that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide and/or are presently used, or have been used in the past, or may be susceptible for use to transport interstate or foreign commerce.
lake powell is considered to be navigable waters as its in 2 states
 
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Powder Hound

Well-Known Member
Just asking for clarification here: If the vessel was MANUFACTURED with an ECOS, it MUST be used, right? They are not requiring that older vessels must be retrofitted with an ECOS, at least at this time?
For my September trip, one of my group will be bringing an older 14 foot aluminum boat with an outboard motor. He won't be turned back at the ramp for not having a functioning ECOS, right?
It would really be a bummer to find out at the last minute that he should have installed one prior to trying to launch.
Thanks!
Only boats manufactured with it. Peter
 

JFRCalifornia

Well-Known Member
I don't think it applies to Lake Powell.

What does navigable water mean?
Navigable waters of the United States are those waters that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide and/or are presently used, or have been used in the past, or may be susceptible for use to transport interstate or foreign commerce.
"Navigable waters" is a federal definition, over which the US EPA and Army Corps of Engineers have jurisdiction under the 1972 amendments to the Clean Water Act, defined in that Act as "waters of the United States." Such waters are subject to various regulations related to water quality and use under the Act.

The funny thing about "navigable waters" is that they do not actually necessarily have to be navigable, nor do they need to cross state lines. For example, tributary headwaters are often considered "navigable" because that water source contributes to downstream navigability. So jurisdiction under the federal definition is very broad.... Lake Powell definitely qualifies...

I feel like I'm at work, since this is something I deal with on a constant basis....
 

Maverick5207

Well-Known Member
I once didn't bother to put my lanyard on while I was on one of my jet skis. I was just going for a short cruise. If course I went across a wake at a weird angle and got tossed. The ski went to idle but even at idle, it's faster than I can swim. My buddies took their sweet tome to notice anything so there I sat in the middle of Canyon Lake for the longest time. Finally one of my buddies saw what was going and motored up to the ski and yanked the lanyard, came back and got me, took me to my ski and bitched at me for being so stupid.
I can see how a guy could fall out of a boat. Could happen.....
I have a lanyard on my boat from 1995 and I actually use it. Always have.
 

DeepVee

Well-Known Member
That video was driver error, or throttle-man error. Yes you come off the throttle(s) when the boat fly's but you need to be back on the throttle prior to re-entry to keep the bow up. if you're not on the throttle it'll pitch the boat and stuff the bow. A good lesson for the Tour Boat wakes, :)

BTW, we always have our lanyard on when in our boat at Powell. It's easy to put on and just not worth the risk of that one time you don't put it on.
 

CATD8RII

Active Member
Why would you not use it in Powell? It can get so rough and windy there in a hurry!! And now with the level down so low its even more reason to clip it on!!!
 
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