Dangling rope legend?

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potter water

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It's a great story and entirely possible and even probable. Many features of lake Powell have been named for more trivial people or events. Broken wheel mountain. Bent tree gulch. etc.
 

Jimbo

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I sometimes wonder about the name Llewellyn Gulch. Who was she?
Great story by the way. I used to wonder about DR too but not now.
 

Gem Morris

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My B-I-L is a Shaw who is the nephew of this Merlin Shaw mentioned in the video. SoCotWa actually existed, and ran the river as described, but my B-I-L does not know this man or his daughter.

My B-I-L doesn’t mention SoCotWa much even though he went on many of these river runs. He was not on the trip when it happpened but it was a SoCotWa trip where the 2nd most deadly traffic accident in Utah history happened on the Hole in the Rock Road when an open air truck and trailer loaded with people overturned. The young-ish driver missed a gear downshifting on a steep uphill grade, lost his momentum and started rolling backward and lost control. Many injured and I think 9 killed? There is a memorial on the Hole in the Rock Road about this. It became a bad memory for him - I never knew his connection to SoCotWa for the 55+ years I’ve known him until about 2 years ago. I grew up in the “South Cottonwood” area and had never heard the term SoCotWa until about 2 years ago.
 
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bubba

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To me a legend is like Burt Rutan, or Steve Jobs or Elon Musk, not some guy getting stuck on a rock.

The title should be the “backstory behind the name DR”. Too bad they did not do what most ward boys do and carve in the rock. Socotwa has a nice ring to it.
 

Raven Haven

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The memorial is still there. We stopped and read the story last Spring when we drove the Road. It is located at Carcass Wash at about mile 39. Sad, but interesting.
 

Tiff Mapel

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Hmmm... A plausible story about Dangling Rope. However, when I did my research for "A Wild Redhead Tamed," there were three river runners who named the canyon "Dangling Rope" for a ragged old rope found hanging in the back of the canyon they thought was from the mining era. These river runners called their little group "We Three" and they ran the Colorado River with the Mexican Hat Expeditions from 1954 to 1962.

In case anyone is interested in finding out about how each and every canyon was named at Lake Powell, you can check out the book I co-wrote with Pete Klocki: "A Wild Redhead Tamed." You can find it on Amazon, or directly from the publisher--IUniverse.com. There is also an E-book version too.

Tiff :)
 

Reed

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In case anyone is interested in finding out about how each and every canyon was named at Lake Powell, you can check out the book I co-wrote with Pete Klocki: "A Wild Redhead Tamed." You can find it on Amazon, or directly from the publisher--IUniverse.com. There is also an E-book version too.

Tiff :)
Thanks for the tip...
Just ordered my copy and will be reading it this weekend... of course at Lake Powell. Just haven't yet decided which canyon to fish.... Decisions decisions I know. I am hoping that the full moon doesn't foul things up. But at least I will have a good book to read.
 

Waterbaby

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Well, Llewellyn Gulch was named for Llewellyn Harris, a Utah Mormon pioneer. Somewhere in the canyon is also his inscription--"L. Harris 1891," but I've never found it. Apparently, it's very faint and difficult to find.

Tiff
Tiff, wasn't the inscription supposed to be in the back of the canyon around the area of the big rock slides back in the late 80's?
 

Tiff Mapel

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Tiff, wasn't the inscription supposed to be in the back of the canyon around the area of the big rock slides back in the late 80's?
I have no idea? I've never seen anything that said where the inscription might be. I just usually look in places where I *think* I'd find inscriptions.

Tiff
 

Ron McKinney

Well-Known Member
Hmmm... A plausible story about Dangling Rope. However, when I did my research for "A Wild Redhead Tamed," there were three river runners who named the canyon "Dangling Rope" for a ragged old rope found hanging in the back of the canyon they thought was from the mining era. These river runners called their little group "We Three" and they ran the Colorado River with the Mexican Hat Expeditions from 1954 to 1962.

In case anyone is interested in finding out about how each and every canyon was named at Lake Powell, you can check out the book I co-wrote with Pete Klocki: "A Wild Redhead Tamed." You can find it on Amazon, or directly from the publisher--IUniverse.com. There is also an E-book version too.

Tiff :)
I have the book and think it's a very good read.
 

DQDanny

Well-Known Member
15-20 years ago, I boated at Powell with a nice couple from Sterling, Colorado. They were George & Pat Borner. George shared a story with me that he found a signature & date of an early explorer of the area, in Llewlleyn Gulch. I remember George telling me he contacted someone of authority regarding this, & they went out to verify the find, & gave George credit for this. The canyon is really small compared to 20 years ago when we parked house boats in the canyon, but the signature & date was always described to me as being on the left, on the boulders/rocks that caved down, & on the backside of the boulder. I looked one summer for the signature but never found it. I looked up George Borner tonight, & I see he passed away 3 years ago. George showed me a picture of what he found, but I don't have a copy myself. The signature is there somewhere.
 

Waterbaby

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Staff member
15-20 years ago, I boated at Powell with a nice couple from Sterling, Colorado. They were George & Pat Borner. George shared a story with me that he found a signature & date of an early explorer of the area, in Llewlleyn Gulch. I remember George telling me he contacted someone of authority regarding this, & they went out to verify the find, & gave George credit for this. The canyon is really small compared to 20 years ago when we parked house boats in the canyon, but the signature & date was always described to me as being on the left, on the boulders/rocks that caved down, & on the backside of the boulder. I looked one summer for the signature but never found it. I looked up George Borner tonight, & I see he passed away 3 years ago. George showed me a picture of what he found, but I don't have a copy myself. The signature is there somewhere.

That is what I'd always heard, it was in the slide area......
 
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