BEWARE of ANCHORS - Biggest threat to require decontamination

wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
#1
So far this month (4 days) there have been 13 boats that failed the test at the top of the ramp because the anchor had mussels attached. Please know that the bottom of the lake near shore where boats can anchor has a huge mussel population. Mussels are always looking for a new place to attach that has fewer mussels than their current home. When a metal anchor lands close by, attached mussels can detach, walk a short distance and then reattach in the new location.

When fishing I have caught mussels while retrieving a crank bait. Mussels react quickly. An anchor holding a boat in place for an hour while eating lunch can have numerous tiny mussel attached when the anchor is retrieved. Each time the anchor is pulled, take a minute to inspect it for mussels. The biggest cause of boats failing the inspection at the top of the ramp is a mussel on the anchor. Lets save time and money for both the visiting boater and the ramp technician. Please check your anchor for invasive species. Remove any mussels, plants, mud or debris.


Invasive Mussel Prevention Requirements on Lake Powell


Quagga Mussels were discovered in Lake Powell in 2013. Lake Powell boaters are required to Clean and Drain boats before leaving the ramp. Boats must be dried for 7 days in summer, 18 days in fall, 30 days in winter before launching in any other water. If drying time cannot be met then the boat must be decontaminated before launching in any other water.
Ramps are now open 24/7


Beware of ANCHORS and ropes - They are the most likely means of unkowningly transporting mussels from Lake Powell to another lake.
Boaters are encouraged to continue to help stop the spread of invasive mussels by making sure their vessels and boating equipment are cleaned, drained, and completely dry before moving to a new body of water, make sure that any boats being moved from infested waters to non-infested waters are properly decontaminated prior to launching.

ALL Boats must have DRY live wells and bilge. Any water in live well or bilge triggers a mandatory decontamination. Make sure live wells and bilge are dry!

Thanks for your cooperation and desire to keep the mussels from moving any farther.

Wayne Gustaveson
 

CHRIS MCBETH

Well-Known Member
#2
Wayne we dropped a metal anchor in Last Chance and buoy’d it there for 3 days. When retrieved it was covered by what appeared to be small larvae or worms not more than a few mm long. They were attached en mass and we’d never seen anything like it. We’re they just worms, or is this what larval quagga look like?
 

wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Wayne we dropped a metal anchor in Last Chance and buoy’d it there for 3 days. When retrieved it was covered by what appeared to be small larvae or worms not more than a few mm long. They were attached en mass and we’d never seen anything like it. We’re they just worms, or is this what larval quagga look like?
No it is not a small quagga but I am not sure what it is either?
 

Zman

Active Member
#4
I have never had my anchor inspected after all these years. I never have it under water more than 12 hours but apparently it does not take long. If I pull my anchor and it sits on my floor for a 4 hour ride home is that enough time to kill these bastards. I know my stuff is dry when I get home.
 

wayne gustaveson

Moderator
Staff member
#5
I have never had my anchor inspected after all these years. I never have it under water more than 12 hours but apparently it does not take long. If I pull my anchor and it sits on my floor for a 4 hour ride home is that enough time to kill these bastards. I know my stuff is dry when I get home.
The mussel will likely be dead in the summer time when its hot but it will still be attached to the anchor. It is illegal to transport any mussels alive or dead. So just check your anchor and make sure any mussels are removed before departing - alive or dead.