Anchoring Tip - Tribal Knowledge

mofaster

Member
Learned this anchoring scheme some years ago from an old Lake Powell timer who was watching me chase my boat around in high winds while camped at Lone Rock. One of the best boating tips I have ever learned. Put it in a PDF if anyone wants to take a peek. This is not for a houseboat, but for a typical ski/wake boat.

God bless.

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Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
I'm going to pick a fight with you.

Ready?

Learn to use an Anchor Buddy.

I've been thru those same 50 mph winds on Lone Rock Beach - been going there for 30 years. Never had my anchor come loose. Anchor bow out.

So what's the advantage over your system?

When you board your boat you pull it to shore and step on instead of having to swim to your boat.

In July the swim might be refreshing. Not so much in November.
 

Cookie

Well-Known Member
Last time I used an Anchor Buddy, we were out on the lake in another boat, my boat anchored back at camp, and the wind came up. When we got back the anchor buddy was completely stretched out and my boat was sitting on rocks getting pounded. It stretched it so much that the stretchy cords inside were torn apart. The rope stretch at least 50 ft. In my experience, they work great is calmer conditions.
 

Ryan

Well-Known Member
Last time I used an Anchor Buddy, we were out on the lake in another boat, my boat anchored back at camp, and the wind came up. When we got back the anchor buddy was completely stretched out and my boat was sitting on rocks getting pounded. It stretched it so much that the stretchy cords inside were torn apart. The rope stretch at least 50 ft. In my experience, they work great is calmer conditions.
When set up per instructions that is much less likely to happen. Did you use the 2nd rope (the one that says 45’ in this photo)?

97FB1F9A-8E2B-4E12-9173-5A504FD0FA28.jpeg
 

mofaster

Member
I'm going to pick a fight with you.

Ready?

Learn to use an Anchor Buddy.

I've been thru those same 50 mph winds on Lone Rock Beach - been going there for 30 years. Never had my anchor come loose. Anchor bow out.

So what's the advantage over your system?

When you board your boat you pull it to shore and step on instead of having to swim to your boat.
For me, I don't want to have to put the bow of my bow in sand, rock, etc. So, I would rather get a little wet if needed. Most of the time, I can swing out the stern towards the shore line to allow everyone to get on while wading in maybe thigh high water. Looks like a great system though, was not aware of it.
 
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Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
Just set your danforth so that your boat CANT touch the shore. I love my boat too much to let it hit the shore - sand or not
 

bdn

Active Member
I go to great lengths to make sure the only thing my boat touches besides the water is the boat trailer. I’ve used many systems over the years to make that happen, even going so far as to select a houseboat site that will accommodate an option to secure the speed boat away from shore. Thanks for the tip, looks like a nice option to have in my back pocket for a future use!
 

Desert Dory

Member
Being a Powell newbie, I scoured this site for info prior to going on my first trip there last month (awesome trip BTW).

One thing that might be misleading to newbie's like myself is both of these diagrams showing the boats being staked on the shore side of the diagram.

No staking/pinning on on shore, correct?
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
Being a Powell newbie, I scoured this site for info prior to going on my first trip there last month (awesome trip BTW).

One thing that might be misleading to newbie's like myself is both of these diagrams showing the boats being staked on the shore side of the diagram.

No staking/pinning on on shore, correct?
Lone Rock beach (and MANY beaches at Lake Powell) are sand. You can drive a stake into sand. "Pinning" refers to drilling a hole into sandstone with an impact drill then driving a metal stake (rebar, etc) into that hole.
 

thladek

Member
In a moderate storm a few years ago, I woke in the middle of the night with my anchor buddy stretched to the max and the box anchor pulled 50 yards away from the original anchor spot (in sand). Had I not woken up, I would have eventually been in the rocks.

The back-up rope in the diagram above would have helped but probably not with a box anchor because of lack of slope. I don't trust the box anchor/anchor buddy system anymore for strong winds. It is great and convenient for temporary anchoring in mild-moderate conditions. I would probably trust the anchor buddy with a danforth, plenty of slope and a back-up rope.

I have used the OP's system once and it worked great (no storm test though). But there are limitations--you need a lot more space for the ski boat to swing 360 degrees and you need a gently sloping beach.
 

Gem Morris

Well-Known Member
In a moderate storm a few years ago, I woke in the middle of the night with my anchor buddy stretched to the max and the box anchor pulled 50 yards away from the original anchor spot (in sand). Had I not woken up, I would have eventually been in the rocks.

The back-up rope in the diagram above would have helped but probably not with a box anchor because of lack of slope. I don't trust the box anchor/anchor buddy system anymore for strong winds. It is great and convenient for temporary anchoring in mild-moderate conditions. I would probably trust the anchor buddy with a danforth, plenty of slope and a back-up rope.

I have used the OP's system once and it worked great (no storm test though). But there are limitations--you need a lot more space for the ski boat to swing 360 degrees and you need a gently sloping beach.
2 words:

1. box
2. anchor
 

Littlesaltwash

Well-Known Member
There was a thread last winter where a wording mentioned using a snow mobile bungee instead of the lighter anchor buddy. I bought one but haven’t had the chance to use it yet. Seems a lot heavier duty than the anchor buddy.
 
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